Doing Life Together

Doing Life Together


Veterans Who Have Paid A Price With TBI and PTSD

posted by Linda Mintle

militaryToday we honor our veterans who have served in our armed forces. Every day we are thankful for the freedom they secured, but today especially, we honor them as a nation.

As we appreciate the service of so many women and men, we realize the personal price paid. The wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have left approximately 22% of Veterans who fought in combat with traumatic brain injuries (TBI). This is almost double what was experienced in VietNam.

TBI results from blasts, blast plus motor vehicle accidents (MVA’s), MVA’s alone, and gunshot wounds. When a soldier has been exposed to a blast, he/she may experience the post-concussive symptoms for longer than a civilian and have residual symptoms for 18-24 months after the injury.

A tag along disorder is Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), previously known as shell shock or battle fatigue. It is a condition experienced after someone has witnessed a trauma, physical event or terror so often seen in war. The reactions of shock, anger, fear, nervousness and guilt can be relived or avoided when something triggers the memory. PTSD can cause a Veteran to be moody, irritable, startle easily and cause problems with sleep, concentration, showing affection and more. Add to PTSD and TBI, chronic pain and substance abuse as potential problems as well.

But there are treatments available through the VA system. There are four  Polytrauma Rehabilitation Centers and 21 Polytrauma Network Sites dedicated to treating TBI. Veterans may need ongoing cognitive and vocational rehabilitation, case management, and pharmacological intervention to return to their highest level of function. Treatments that seem to work best with PTSD and TBI include cognitive processing therapy, prolonged exposure and/or use of medications.If you are a Veteran or know someone who is and needs treatment, contact the VA for help.

Also be aware of the National Intrepid Center of Excellence, a Department of Defense initiative dedicated to providing cutting edge evaluation, treatment planning, research and education for service members and their families dealing with psychological health issues and TBI. Here is the link. 

And again, thank you for your service!



Previous Posts

Body-Brain Connection: When Bigger Really is Better
"As your weight goes up, the size and function of your brain goes down." This, according to psychiatrist, Daniel Amen. It's true, smaller doesn't always mean better, especially when it comes to the size of your brain! Dr. Amen, author of Change Your Brain, Change Your Body, wants us all to get o

posted 9:27:01am Jul. 17, 2014 | read full post »

5 Proactive Steps to Get Rid of Job Worry
Downsizing, added work loads, difficult co-workers, budget cuts and poor leadership can cause even the calmest person to worry on the job. On way to deal with stress and job worries is to control the things you can and trust God for the rest. Here are 5 proactive steps you can take in order to g

posted 7:00:22am Jul. 15, 2014 | read full post »

Hair Raising: Kids Getting Bikini Waxes
When the New York Post reported that 14-year-old Glynis Coyne has been getting her legs waxed since she was eight years old, I just gasped. Apparently, I am not up on the trend--hair removal for prepubescent girls! Instead of a trip to the candy store, a growing number of moms choose spa visits. The

posted 7:00:32am Jul. 14, 2014 | read full post »

10 Reasons Couples Therapy Needs a Spiritual Base
Let's say your marriage is hurting and you know you need help. If you are a Christian couple, does it matter who you see and what approach the person uses to help you? Absolutely. So much of couples therapy is based on a secular humanistic approach and not on the truths of Christianity. Here i

posted 7:00:27am Jul. 11, 2014 | read full post »

Health Worries? The Internet a Blessings and a Curse!
So I am reading the morning paper, enjoying my coffee, when I come across a small article tucked in the health and wellness section of the Wall Street Journal. According to research in a British journal, calcium supplements, typically used to prevent osteoporosis, now appear to increase the risk f

posted 7:00:12am Jul. 09, 2014 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.