Doing Life Together

Doing Life Together


School Casino Night: Harmless Fun or Risk for Addiction?

posted by Linda Mintle

It’s “Casino Night” at the local high school. The flyer sent home reads, “Bring your family for a night of food and fun and raise money for our school.” But is exposing kids to the real world of gambling and betting a good way to fund raise? Isn’t this just harmless fun?

Walk the halls of most high schools and you’ll find teens gambling before, during and after school. It is estimated that 4-6% of all adolescents are pathological gamblers and even more gamble occasionally. Whether it is playing craps, cards, football pools, sports betting, lottery, dice or pool, it all begins as harmless fun. But what may surprise you is that teens are more susceptible to gambling than adults. This is due to their impulsivity, peer pressure influences, emerging egos, desire to win, lack of understanding the consequences of gambling and feelings of invincibility.

Gambling has gone mainstream in American culture and has desensitized our kids to the problem of addiction and financial ruin that pathological gambling bring. From an early age, kids learn that winning is what counts. During adolescence, that competitive spirit coupled with fragile identity, ego formation and little fear of the consequences of behavior can lead to risk-taking behavior. Gambling represents quick money, a quick fix and a way to be “in” with those who see no harm in such activities. Every “win” reinforces the activity. For those at risk for addiction, “harmless fun” ends in bondage.

Usually those who become addicted are intelligent, risk-takers, perfectionists, impulsive, high energy, good students and possibly involved in drugs and alcohol. Parents are often unaware of the problem because these teens appear to have their act together. But the signs of a gambling problem are identifiable. They are: 1) Preoccupation with gambling. 2) More money is needed to achieve the excitement of gambling. 3) Efforts to stop, cut back or control gambling are unsuccessful. 4) Gambling is used to escape and avoid life problems. 5) Gambling continues even though money is lost. 6) The extent of the problem is denied and lied about to others. 6) Financing the habit may involve illegal activities. 7) Relationships, jobs, educational or career opportunities are lost because of gambling. 8) Desperation leads to asking for money.

Ultimately, the spiritual state of the teen must be addressed as he/she realizes that indulging in impulsive acts always has consequences and “luck” is not a biblical concept. Our lives are purposeful, planned and directed by God. Surrender is the key. As we surrender to His higher purposes and take responsibility for our behavior, He guides and directs our lives. Psalm 37:23 reminds us that chance isn’t a part of the Christian life, “The steps of a good man are ordered by the Lord, And He delights in His way.”

There are no quick fixes or short cuts to the refining God wants to do when forming our character and development. When we realize that only the things of God can satisfy the deep yearnings of the heart, we are less inclined to turn to other things that promise success but don’t deliver. Taking a chance with God is no gamble at all. There are no losers in God’s family. In other words, life with God is a win-win! And that’s a truth you can count on!



  • http://www.gamblersguard.com Mike

    I think free games can be the first step into real world of casinos. In my opinion its not a harmless fun…

  • http://perheadwagering.com/ wagering software

    Thanks for this great post. I really appreciate your idea.

  • http://onlinecasinosdoc.com.au Jessica Ray

    I think it’s ok when people play free games, but you people for whom gambling is like a disease should stay away from real casinos.

  • Pingback: School Casino Night: Harmless Fun or Risk for Addiction? | Dr. Linda Mintle

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