Doing Life Together

Doing Life Together


How To Handle a Bully

posted by Linda Mintle

Now that we are well into the school year, kids everywhere are faced with the challenge of how to deal with bullies.

Here’s a typical encounter: Your 5th grade son is playing soccer on the playground at recess. A 6th grade bully comes over and takes his ball, throws it at him and laughs as he walks away. What should your son do?

a) Throw the ball back at him

b) Walk away and say nothing

c) Report the boy to school authorities

d) Go after the kid and try to talk to him

e) Initiate “The Swarm”

Dads tend to choose answer A because they want their sons to fight back. Moms like answer D because we think problems can be solved by talking them out. Answer B is good if you can get your son to do it, but it does nothing to correct the bully behavior.  Answer C works if adults are involved and will actually do something. Reporting a bully is sometimes unpopular because kids fear revenge and being labeled a tattletale. So that leaves us with answer E. The Swarm is an effective technique. Your son gets a number of his friends to literally swarm the bully and tell the bully to stop. There is power in numbers and the bully will have to contend with the entire group, not just your son.

You can also help your children prepare for a bully attack this way. Ask them to write down bully situations on 3 X 5 cards. They will come up with examples in no time. Then role-play the situations and practice different ways to handle a specific problem. Talk about why some solutions are good choices and others not so good. Role-playing exercises like this one helps children think what they might do before they encounter the problem. Then when a bully situation presents, they have a plan and can act more confidently.

 



  • http://AddaURLtothiscomment Ellena Smith

    In my opinion, bullying is a real problem that needs to be solved as a family and the best we can do parent, is that pay attention with our children. Being a good listener is an important piece of your role when a child is being bullied, try to be supportive but neutral when your child is talking. The idea of my children being harmed or lost is not something anyone wants to consider. I would like to share this link, about a service on how to protect children. Check out this link: http://safekidzone.com/

  • Pingback: How To Handle a Bully | Dr. Linda Mintle

Previous Posts

Should You Celebrate or Ignore Halloween?
A reader asked: My husband and I talked about it and decided we are not going to celebrate Halloween. Our child is three-years old and she really doesn’t know much about the holiday yet, but we do. I have been surprised at how many people, Christians included, have given us a hard time about ou

posted 6:00:51am Oct. 31, 2014 | read full post »

Can You Multi-Task If You Are A Digital Native?
Lately, we've heard a lot about people who think they can multitask but perform poorly. So parents all over America are turning off music and screens, telling their teens to focus on the single task of studying. Good idea, right? Maybe not for all teens. Two high school researchers put togethe

posted 6:00:05am Oct. 28, 2014 | read full post »

10 Ways to Recover and Respond to Angry Email
It happens to all of us. Someone sends an email that upsets us and we react by firing off an angry response. This impulse to react usually leads to regret and ends up damaging our relationships. So how do we respond to hurt, upset or accusation from an email? And what do we do if we react in a

posted 6:00:35am Oct. 27, 2014 | read full post »

Is Fear Stopping You From Taking Medications?
If you have ever seen a TV commercial for a specific drug, you probably wonder why anyone would ever take that drug. The speed reading list of possible side effects is enough to stop most of us from even considering that drug. But the FDA requires that ads list the possible side effects of a medicat

posted 6:00:50am Oct. 23, 2014 | read full post »

Could Watching Violence and Sex in Movies Affect Your Children?
Mr. and Mrs. Johnson are considered good parents. But are they too lenient when it comes to letting their children watch movies filled with sex and violence? A new study sheds light on why parents may be too lenient when it comes to allowing children to view sex and violence in films. The Annen

posted 6:00:06am Oct. 22, 2014 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.