The Deacon's Bench

The Deacon's Bench


Stephen Colbert cites Matthew 25

posted by jmcgee

His now-famous — and infamous — testimony on Capitol Hill included one surprising moment when, it seems, he broke character and quoted this scripture passage.

Colbert teaches Sunday school at his Catholic parish Montclaire, New Jersey. It’s nice to see him using a bigger classroom.  He’d make a great deacon. 



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Colbertfan

posted September 25, 2010 at 9:48 am


Deacon Greg,
Stephen Colbert has brought humor, insight, and Catholic Social teaching to this issue of migrant farm workers. The comments across the spectrum of the political “analysts” are trying to discredit Colbert as just a comedian, and he wasted time of the American taxpayers yesterday. I think Colbert got the reaction he expected.
And yes, he would be a great deacon!



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Dante

posted September 25, 2010 at 10:16 am


I think he makes a great laymamn (forget the deacon part). It is the role of the laity to effect change in society and culture with the spirit of the Gospel, while it’s our role as clergy to encourage and support our lay brothers and sisters in their Christian witness.



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Deacon Norb

posted September 25, 2010 at 12:04 pm


Dante
Both Deacon Greg and I (and maybe even Deacon Bill) know a deacon — originally from the Cajun Diocese of Houma-Thibodaux Louisiana– who is a gifted comedian and after-dinner speaker.
I have always believed that the very best deacons are what I would call “fully-indigenous-ministers-in-the-marketplace.” If Stephen Colbert wants to walk that walk, then “Praise God for blessings undeserved.”



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Conan776

posted September 25, 2010 at 2:57 pm


It seems to me that too often, at least on the national level, the loudest laity claiming to speak for my faith are the voices on the far right. So I’m happy that there’s a left leaning Catholic voice out there in the form of Mr. Colbert.



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Julie

posted September 25, 2010 at 3:11 pm


He’s bright and amusing for sure, but, despite that he teaches CCD, does he hold to the Church’s teachings on life and the defense of traditional marriage? I heard that he does not, and if not, don’t we have more than enough clergy like that already?



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Sharonann Tomal

posted September 25, 2010 at 4:50 pm


Colbert is just another “cafeteria-style” catholic. He picks and chooses what he wants to believe. Never mind that Jesus valued ALL LIFE, especially those who had no voice, (unborn children) and yes, he also spoke against gay marriage (“man shall not lay down with man, it is an abomination”). This is from the old testament. While it is true that God sent his son to primarily carry the message of “loving one another”, nowhere in the bible does it ever state that God’s views changed on anything. He sent his only Son so that man can be redeemed for his sins and that we each have to walk that walk by ourselves. THERE IS NO COLLECTIVE SALVATION as the President, Speaker Pelosi and other socialists believe. Helping the poor was indeed God’s as well as Jesus’ message, however, what the left seems to forget is that this help was a “CHOICE” that individuals have to make. Jesus made that abundantly clear with his message of, “render unto Caesar what is his and God’s what is God’s”. What do you think this meant? He was clearly saying that charity is always chosen, never dictated by the government because then it becomes evil.



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Hildie

posted September 25, 2010 at 5:46 pm


We didn’t invite illegals to come here. They broke the law and came here on their own. We have a duty to take care of our own first — secure the border and stop the murder of American citizens. Stop the drug dealers and take back the federal park from them.



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Fiergenholt

posted September 25, 2010 at 6:25 pm


Sharonann:
PLEASE explain your statement: “What do you think this meant? He was clearly saying that charity is always chosen, never dictated by the government because then it becomes evil.”
Natural Law (and even Divine Law) has never stated that. Are you making that a dogmatic belief on your own authority ?



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Deacon Greg Kandra

posted September 25, 2010 at 7:27 pm


Sharonann…
Before you label Colbert a customer of the cafeteria, or a liberal (as if that were a slur), please cite some proof. All I’m hearing is hearsay and speculation. All the interviews I’ve seen with him indicate that he’s a thoughtful Catholic who prays, goes to Church, teaches CCD and is struggling to make sense of it all.
Sounds like a lot of the people in the pews to me.
Dcn. G.



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Dante

posted September 25, 2010 at 10:44 pm


Deacon Norb – “fully-indigenous-ministers-in-the-marketplace” is a nice 6 word summary of Vatican II’s decree on the apostolate of the laity. Just as there are different theologies of the priesthood, I suppose there are also different theologies of the diaconate. As you well know, once a man is ordained into the clerical state he ceases to be a layman in the eyes of Christ and the Church. The deacon becomes an exception to the axiom: “if it walks like a duck, quacks like a duck, and looks like a duck…its a duck.” so even though we walk like laymen, quack like laymen and look like laymen…But I DO understand where you are coming from and appreciate the trail that your generation of prioneer deacons had to blaze as you were among the first to emerge in the Church and frequently deal with the lay vs. clerical aspects of life. THANK YOU for your hard work and witness!



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Zack

posted September 25, 2010 at 10:54 pm


The Judgement of the Nations
31 ‘When the Son of Man comes in his glory, and all the angels with him, then he will sit on the throne of his glory. 32All the nations will be gathered before him, and he will separate people one from another as a shepherd separates the sheep from the goats, 33and he will put the sheep at his right hand and the goats at the left. 34Then the king will say to those at his right hand, “Come, you that are blessed by my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world; 35 for I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you welcomed me, 36 I was naked and you gave me clothing, I was sick and you took care of me, I was in prison and you visited me.” 37 Then the righteous will answer him, “Lord, when was it that we saw you hungry and gave you food, or thirsty and gave you something to drink? 38And when was it that we saw you a stranger and welcomed you, or naked and gave you clothing? 39And when was it that we saw you sick or in prison and visited you?”
40 And the king will answer them, “Truly I tell you, just as you did it to one of the least of these who are members of my family,* you did it to me.”
41 Then he will say to those at his left hand, “You that are accursed, depart from me into the eternal fire prepared for the devil and his angels; 42 for I was hungry and you gave me no food, I was thirsty and you gave me nothing to drink, 43 I was a stranger and you did not welcome me, naked and you did not give me clothing, sick and in prison and you did not visit me.” 44 Then they also will answer, “Lord, when was it that we saw you hungry or thirsty or a stranger or naked or sick or in prison, and did not take care of you?”
45 Then he will answer them, “Truly I tell you, just as you did not do it to one of the least of these, you did not do it to me.”



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Anchor Baby

posted September 25, 2010 at 10:59 pm


Sharonann Tamal, said:
“Colbert is just another “cafeteria-style” catholic. He picks and chooses what he wants to believe.”
Maybe you are the “cafeteria-sytle” catholic or not catholic at all, Mrs. Sharonann Tamal. I do not know where did you get that helping the poor is a “CHOICE” that individuals have to make for their salvation. It’s not a “CHOICE” for a catholic. Faith and helping the poor it is essential in Catholicism [James 2:14-26]. Maybe you should reread your “Catholicism for Dummies”, Mrs. Sharonann Tamal.
Peace.



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thinker

posted September 26, 2010 at 12:56 am


The problem with the state giving to the poor is that you do not have a choice and therefore receive no blessing from the act. Christ will reward those who give by freedom of choice. And a tenth is not the measure of giving that is worthy of reward from most people. For without faith it is impossible to please Him. So everyone that supports the states control of their giving or seeks to reward the politicians with their vote in exchange for their gifts will be shocked at the worthlessness of their acts. God must be honored through the giving by faith, not some small government.



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Deacon Norb

posted September 26, 2010 at 4:50 am


Thinker:
This weekend, in the churches that use the “Common Lectionary” (such as the Roman Catholic Church), the first reading is from the Book of Amos — a very small book within the middle layer of the TaNaKh. Years ago I had the awesome opportunity to study this book in detail under one of the greatest professors Hebrew Union College/Jewish Institute of Religion ever had.
Whenever Professor Rivkin had the opportunity to talk about Amos, he would go into detail about the community-wide social injustice Amos found near the Jewish shrine of Beth-El; how he fearlessly preached against that injustice; and how he got into trouble with the local secular authorities because of that fearless proclamation.
My homily this weekend spun off of Professor Rivkin’s insight that a community can sin as well as an individual. Families can sin communally; churches can sin communally; societies and nations can sin communally.
According to good Catholic teaching, we have to first recognize that we have sinned, admit our faults and then have (what our Pre-Vatican teachers insisted) a “firm purpose of amendment” never to commit that sin again.
NOW, you are absolutely correct: individuals do have a choice here (and for that matter, so do the communities we live in). Individuals often ignore the evil that they do themselves and — even if they recognize it — often attempt to justify it with mitigating circumstances.
The same with the wider communities. Look back in American history and you will easily enough find thousands of times/events where our society justified objective social evil and where it failed to its moral obligation as a community to admit its faults and make a “firm purpose of amendment.”
I would take the position here that it absolutely is an obligation of a community (of whatever size)to recognize the injustice within itself and to take remedial action to make sure it never happens again.



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Katherine

posted September 26, 2010 at 9:31 am


The problem with the state giving to the poor …
The “state” needs to give to the unborn the protection law. It also needs to (as Mr. Colbert requests) give migrant farmworkers the protection of law for safe workplaces, sanitary working conditions, payment of wages owed to them, compensation for bodily harm they suffer on the job and the God-give right to association.
I intend to do all I can for justice for the poor. I will take my chances as to if God rewards me or ignores my works.



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Thomas

posted September 26, 2010 at 10:20 am


I fail to see how SC displays any sort of moral character for such a vocation? Unless the diaconate is a joke.



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Panthera

posted September 26, 2010 at 11:21 am


Kathrine said:
I intend to do all I can for justice for the poor. I will take my chances as to if God rewards me or ignores my works.
endquote
What more need be said?
All these arrogant attacks on “State based welfare” are nothing more than an excuse with which to avoid helping those in our society whose needs exceed anything a private person can offer.
Goodness, has everyone forgotten the Deepwater Horizon disaster? What would have happened had the government taken the position advocated here?
There is something deeply hypocritical in all these calls to end state involvement in helping people while, at the same time, demanding the state forbid women dominion over their own bodies and strip gays of their civil and human rights.



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RomCath

posted September 26, 2010 at 12:21 pm


DcnGreg
How is it that we continue to subjected to the constant hanrangue that everything in life boils down to abortion and gay “rights”? Aren’t there any other issues of far greater importance to the life of the church than this nonsense?



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RomCath

posted September 26, 2010 at 12:24 pm


The government “response” to the Deepwater crisis was pathetic at best. In the early days many nations offered help which was refused. It allowed millions of gallons of oil to flow for weeks on end. If this is how the government helps, they should keep their help.



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Panthera

posted September 26, 2010 at 12:53 pm


RomCath,
Regrettably, you appear to have overlooked the facts in the Deep Horizon disaster.
The federal and state governments permitted the companies involved to lead the mitigation efforts for quite some time – resulting in the enormous damage.
I suggest you get your facts straight before launching further attempts to discredit others.
I do find it both hypocritical and unChristian that those calling for making government small enough to drown in a bathtub – and then drowning it are also the same folks who demand the government impose their private interpretations of scripture on everyone else.
Remember, RomCath, your er$twhile allieS in this culture war have, far longer, been the irreconcilable enemies of the Roman Catholic church – those who lie with dogs wake up with flees and should you succeed in stripping women and gays of the few remaining rights we have, you may be assured Catholics will be next on their list.



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RomCath

posted September 26, 2010 at 1:18 pm


Panthera, I was happy when you took an all too brief powder from here. Since you continue the gibberish, I guess I will do what you have failed to do–take a powder.
As far as I know, no one is stripping any Catholics here of any rights. No fears here on that score.
When you become more aware of Christianity and less worried about your so-called rights maybe we can talk.
As far as the reponse of Mr. Obama and the government, it was pathetic. How many people are still without their livelihood? We will see how much the people love what the government is doing come November I am sure.



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Donal Mahoney

posted September 26, 2010 at 2:44 pm


I had read previously that Colbert was reared a Catholic but had become a Protestant. Does anyone know if that is true. Or if he came back to the Church?



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Katherine

posted September 26, 2010 at 4:31 pm


Donal,
Mr. Colbert is an active Catholic and teaches religious education in his parish in New Jersey.



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Marian

posted September 26, 2010 at 5:29 pm


“We didn’t invite illegals to come here. They broke the law and came here on their own.
Right, we didn’t invite them. But “we” (society) certainly entices them by providing jobs.



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Nick

posted September 26, 2010 at 6:28 pm


“But “we” (society) certainly entices them by providing jobs.”
We didn’t tempt them, they sought what they had not.



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Anchor Baby

posted September 26, 2010 at 6:47 pm


Looking for a job and working in order to provide food to your family must be an awful sin for some “real catholics” just because you “broke” the law.



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pagansister

posted September 26, 2010 at 8:26 pm


Personally, I’m glad Colbert testified before Congress. How many of those arrogant Congressmen have spent 2 minutes, never mind a day, picking beans? Yes, Colbert probably went to pick beans to make a segment for his TV show—-however, the point was made and he did get to experience some of what the immigrants do. Whether he is a “good” Catholic or not? Bean picking has nothing to do with how faithfully he attends and adheres to his chosen religion.



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Patrick Madrid

posted September 26, 2010 at 11:59 pm


RomCath said, “How is it that we continue to subjected [sic] to the constant hanrangue that everything in life boils down to abortion and gay ‘rights’? Aren’t there any other issues of far greater importance to the life of the church than this nonsense?”
Oh please. I am so tired of such cant. It’s the functional equivalent of an American Catholic in 1860 asking, “How is it that we continue to be subjected to the constant hanrangue that everything in life boils down to slavery and white ‘supremacy’? Aren’t there any other issues of far greater importance to the life of the church than this nonsense?”
The far better question is, “How is it that folks like RomCath can actually believe such fatuous nonsense?”



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Michael Barber

posted September 27, 2010 at 2:33 am


I like a lot of what I have seen on Colbert. However, I thought his “testimony” was a disgraceful display that really was quite inappropriate. Perhaps some may think it was simply “harmless” fun. I prefer to maintain some decorum. Was it funny? Yes. Was it appropriate? Is this the way tax dollars should be spent? Absolutely not.
Simply put, he made a mockery of congress, for, what few would deny, was a ratings stunt.
Shameful.



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Fleeb

posted September 27, 2010 at 6:46 am


Colbert make a great deacon? Are you serious? His mockery of the Catholic Church on his TV show is non-stop. You can’t have it both ways and I’d drop the personality worship and see right through this guy…yes, he’s funny but a defender of the faith?
If the criteria for becoming a deacon is having a comedy routine or connecting with the “kids” (Life Teen drivel comes to mind), then I have grave concern for the permanant diaconate program.



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AndreJohn

posted September 27, 2010 at 7:29 am


No f=ing way, is this true? I thought he was just another comedian,
but after what he said, WTG the Colbert Report! (EMMY from JohnStewart)
P.S. was that a comment from the “Patrick Madrid” from EWTN, really?
wow, bigtime Mr.DeaconGregKandra, now ur famous! WTG! goodluck uknow.



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Georgetu

posted September 27, 2010 at 8:12 am


I second Fleeb.
Hopefully, you were joking, Dcn Greg.
If a deacon thinks the dissenter Colbert would make a good deacon, then I have lost respect for deacons.



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RomCath

posted September 27, 2010 at 9:01 am


“How is it that folks like RomCath can actually believe such fatuous nonsense?”
Maybe because they read the Scripture and the teaching of the Church?
Patrick if those two issues define your world view or your moral compass it is very sad. My sympathy to you.



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Leonard

posted September 27, 2010 at 10:05 am


These days I will applaud Truth wherever I find it. I am concerned that ‘Lazarus’ is being totally ignored, here in the US and abroad. I have been disallusioned a lot lately by our Political Leaders of both Parties. I think Americans need to ask Washington for a lot more transparancy. How about all of the unanswered questions of the families of all the victims of 9/11? This is a story that has been completely swept under the rug.



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Patrick Madrid

posted September 27, 2010 at 10:08 am


Okay, RomCath, since you made the claim, I invite you to show us all where exactly Scripture and the teaching of the Church characterize abortion and homosexual activity as “nonsense” (see your original quote above). Just one Bible verse and a paragraph from the Catechism should suffice.
And while you’re at it, please also show us where Scripture and the teachings of the Church indicate that there are other issues “of far greater importance” than the killing of unborn children.
Thanks.
P.S. I do appreciate your sympathy, and I hope you can appreciate the fact that your most recent comment here has nudged the needle on your “fatuous meter” a little further into the red zone.



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RomCath

posted September 27, 2010 at 10:28 am


Patrick, I think you misunderstood my original post. What I meant was nonsense is the fact that people think abortion and homosexuality activity/unions are “rights”. I am totally in accord with the church on both issues. There are no scriptural or church teaching that defend or condone either.
What I was criticizing was the fact that some posters, no matter what the topic of blog, work both those issues into their comments claiming victimhood because these so-called “rights’ are denied to them.
Sorry if I failed to make myself clear.



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Patrick Madrid

posted September 27, 2010 at 10:51 am


Ohhhhhhh. Wow, did I ever misunderstand you! I’m sorry about that. Did you also misunderstand my comments? In any case, thanks for clearing that up for me. I’m relieved, and I withdraw that bit about fatuousness.



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RomCath

posted September 27, 2010 at 11:43 am


I guess I did too. No offense taken.



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Evaneco

posted September 27, 2010 at 3:30 pm


Linking to this video, Andrew Sullivan lauds Colbert as an authentic Catholic [link below].
Heh.
You mean, Andrew Sullivan who berates Rome because of its ‘unreasonable’ intractability on the sanctity of life and marriage? Or Stephen Colbert who honors traditional devotions at Christmas and teaches CCD, then smacks down pro-lifers and the DOMA?
Defenders of Catholic authenticity?
Really?
Colbert quotes Christ’s “least brothers” theme from Matt 25. Couple thoughts back:
- If [Catholic!] Mexico actually cared for its poor, Americans would have enough left over to pay for our poor. Colbert should be testifying to the Mexican congress, not ours.
- The fact that American businessmen pay migrant workers a living wage compared to what the defunct Mexican economy will provide, and that we already permit our elected officials to generously subsidize the critical health/education/subsistence needs of illegal immigrants, is evidence of the greatness of America, not its lack of compassion.
- Benedict’s latest encyclical on Matt 25 is also relevant:
“The Holy Father reminds us how “Jesus identifies himself with those in need, with the hungry, the thirsty, the stranger, the naked, the sick and those in prison. ‘as you did it to one of these my brethren, you did it to me’” (Mt 25:40). This Gospel passage demonstrates how “Love of God and love of neighbor have become one: in the least of the brethren we find Jesus himself, and in Jesus we find God” (No. 15). This flows, says Benedict, from the encounter with the living person of Jesus Christ.
Money quote: “The beginning of Christian existence is not an ethical decision or a sublime idea, but rather the encounter with an event, with a person, who gives life a new goal and at the same time, a sure growth.” That’s the Pope’s idea of authentic Catholicism: a personal relationship with Jesus Christ, reflected in ones life of public service.
Based on their public personna, do Colbert nor Sullivan bear evidence of such an encounter?
The atheist quoted in the article actually calls Colbert the greatest “American Catholic.” Many American Catholics are Catholic by culture and tradition, not by confession.
I’d certainly risk going along with that.
********
http://andrewsullivan.theatlantic.com/the_daily_dish/2010/09/stephen-colbert-the-greatest-catholic-of-our-moment.html



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pagansister

posted September 27, 2010 at 4:47 pm


Someone (Fleeb?) above seems to imply that Colbert can’t be a comic and be a faithful Catholic at the same time, because he mocks the RCC. One can separate one’s means of making an extremely good living with one’s faith. The god he worships and the church he supports with his time and money can tell the difference. The only person who knows the depth of his faith is Colbert and his god.



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Anchor Baby

posted September 27, 2010 at 6:29 pm


To Evaneco:
Yes [Catholic!] México cares about his poors and don’t make a fuss about it like other “good” Christian do. We will love to have Colbert in our “Congreso de la Unión”.
BTW, Colbert is doing a service his Church when he criticizes it and that doesn’t make him less Catholic. Yes, I also think that he could be a great deacon.
It’s SO funny how American Catholics often call a Catholic an “uncatholic” just because he or she dissents or criticizes.



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David Ulmer

posted September 28, 2010 at 6:32 am


I do not get how any committed Christian could approve of Colbert, let alone a committed Catholic Christian. He mocks so much that is central to Christianity. Seriously, a good deacon? Perhaps I am just missing something, but I really don’t see it. It seems it would be wise to “not be partners with him.”
Eph. 5:3 “But among you there must not be even a hint of sexual immorality, or of any kind of impurity, or of greed, because these are improper for God’s holy people. Nor should there be obscenity, foolish talk or coarse joking, which are out of place, but rather thanksgiving. For of this you can be sure: No immoral, impure or greedy person—such a man is an idolater—has any inheritance in the kingdom of Christ and of God.[a] Let no one deceive you with empty words, for because of such things God’s wrath comes on those who are disobedient. Therefore do not be partners with them.



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Deacon Greg Kandra

posted September 28, 2010 at 6:49 am


David and others…
As I was reminded often in formation: “God does not call the perfect. He perfects the called.”
Thank God for that. In every sense.
Of course, far as I know, Colbert hasn’t been called by anyone — except, perhaps, his agent. So the point is moot. But he’s obviously gifted, intelligent, passionate, engaging, fervent, and loves the gospel and Christ. Like angels, he takes himself lightly. (So did St. Phillip Neri and Blessed John XXIII.)
Those qualities, I think, are all good starting points for anyone in the Christian life.
Dcn. G.



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DCN C J.

posted September 28, 2010 at 9:17 am


Fine, have colbert and sullivan apply to their diocese for discernment and training to be a deacon in Holy Mother Church and see if they can then yuck it up with Mt. 25 and most especially the Mexican government.
In prayer for immortal souls who make fun of the least among us.



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chris

posted September 28, 2010 at 1:39 pm


Colbert was correct in noting the contradiction of “Inviting immigrants” then “asking them to leave”, and also in noting that “migrant workers” don’t have the same rights as citizens.
That said, he misses a couple of crucial facts:
The first one is that he doesn’t seem to make the distinction between WHO is taking what action.
Businesses & their political patrons are the ones inviting migrant workers, in order to bolster their bottom lines (by paying lower wages & benefits) or to bolster their vote totals (by pandering.)
The people asking them to leave are the ones who are paying the cost for this subsidized labor supply, through increased taxes, increased medical costs, increased insurance costs, etc.. People who cannot compete in the employment marketplace with folks who break American laws that are designed to welcome those who would join America.
Colbert is also right that “migrant workers” don’t have the same rights as citizens – but that’s simply because they aren’t citizens.
If they want the rights of citizens, they can follow the entirely reasonable established process by which they can become citizens. America welcomes nearly a million actual immigrants each year – it’s not like there is no way for people to immigrate to America. The problem is when people claim to have a nonexistent right to live in anyplace they want without concern for the people who already liver there.



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Eric

posted September 28, 2010 at 2:17 pm


Illegal immigrants should have no rights in this country. They receive better health care, schooling, and tax free income than my large Catholic family does and I work 2-3 jobs to make ends meet.
He needs to go back to making jokes.



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jim

posted September 28, 2010 at 2:34 pm


DEACON GREG,
COLBERT, prays . teaches ccd, goes to church .GREAT ! BUT DOES HE HAVE ASSURANCE OF SALVATION / IS HE SAVED ? DOES HE KNOW JESUS AS HIS SAVIOR ? LORD ? YOU JUST HAVE TO BE A FRUIT INSPECTOR THESE DAYS !!
SELAH



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Will

posted September 28, 2010 at 3:13 pm


Jim,
Do you?



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Anchor Baby

posted September 28, 2010 at 9:56 pm


Eric said:
“Illegal immigrants should have no rights in this country. They receive better health care, schooling, and tax free income than my large Catholic family does and I 2-3 jobs to make ends meet”
All human beings should have rights no matter their status, because “all men are created equal” and because is the right thing. You, with a large catholic family should know that.
Undocumented people don’t pay taxes? Really? Because they might not pay an income tax (one of the reasons they were hired, besides cheap labor), but they pay sales taxes, real estate taxes (if they rent or own a home), gasoline taxes…and make your vegetables cheaper so you don’t need to get a 4 job.



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David Ulmer

posted September 29, 2010 at 4:25 am


Dcn G.
I REALLY think you are in need of some adjustment in your perspective, especially as an official representitive of our Church.
I Tim. 3:8
Deacons, likewise, are to be men worthy of respect, sincere, not indulging in much wine, and not pursuing dishonest gain. They must keep hold of the deep truths of the faith with a clear conscience. They must first be tested; and then if there is nothing against them, let them serve as deacons.
The deep truths of the faith are those most intimately connected to life, love, and liberty. As far as I have seen in Colbert and I have watched his show, he is off on all three. He and Sean Hannity who is considered to be on the other side of the isle lack depth. If Sean can publicly accept contraception as a legitimate option, he and Colbert are very immature Catholics and poor representitives of the truth regardless of their political bents.
Please don’t hold him up as a model. You are sadly mistaken in this. As an official teacher in the Church please only hold up those worthy, you are held more responsible than most bloggers. “Not many of you should presume to be teachers, my brothers, because you know that we who teach will be judged more strictly.” (James 3)
We have so many saints and Colbert is certainly not leading anyone to Christ in what he does day in and day out on his show. He may love Christ who is the Gospel, but Colbert has a “funny” way of not showing it. Teaching CCD means nothing unless he has made a claim to hold and teach all that the Church teaches as true. There are WAY too many perverters of the truth out there teaching CCD. Just look at all those Jesuits (in name) out there tearing the Church down and destroying Catholic education.



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Betsy

posted October 1, 2010 at 3:55 pm


Thank God for Stephen Colbert!



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Joe

posted October 2, 2010 at 12:36 pm


Perhaps this should be cited, for reason of clarity:
“And when you pray, you shall not be like the hypocrites. For they love to pray standing in the synagogues and on the street corners, that they may be seen by men. Truly, I say to you, they have received their reward. But when you pray, go into your room, shut the door and pray to your Father, who is in secret; and your Father, who sees in secret, will reward you. And when you pray, do not use empty repetitions as the Gentiles do. For they think that they will be heard for their many words. …”
In other words, according to the Lord who has the last laugh, the real sin
can be hanging out with hypocrites., their religious practices. The Lords recommendation may even save somebody from financial / economic self -betrayal,
sacrifices demanded by hypocrites.



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ThomasD

posted October 4, 2010 at 11:09 am


While concern for the plight of these illegal migrant workers is appropriate, are they truly the least among us? Colbert is Roman Catholic, surely if he thought on it a bit he could think of another group, even more fragile and less protected, that is routinely being harmed due to the law of our society.
Why didn’t Colbert use his opportunity to speak out for the unborn? Surely they are the least among us. What happens to them is surely as permanent as this world. Does Colbert not oppose abortion? Did Colbert place politics above his faith?
[Thomas...good questions, but Colbert was not invited to speak to this particular sub-committee about abortion. The panel in question deals with immigration, citizenship and refugee issues. And this was a direct result of a skit he'd done on his show about working in the fields. Dcn. G.]



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Kiro

posted October 5, 2010 at 2:47 pm


If you care about illegal immigrants, reform the system to make it possible for them to come here legally.
Illegal immigrants are a problem both because they are exploited and because the system of exploitation also creates poverty among legal citizens.
If you are in favor of enabling illegal immigration in this country, then you are supporting both the exploitation of the vulnerable, and also the impoverishment of your own people.
If you want to bring every third world citizen into America and give them rights, then do it legally – without exploitation, and without granting anyone exemption from the laws of the land.



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Kiro

posted October 5, 2010 at 2:49 pm


I should clarify, I do not believe the illegal immigrants “are a problem” in the sense that they are the cause.
The cause is systemic – a system that divides the poor into two groups: those here illegally, who are exploited, and those here legally, who cannot compete for underpaid jobs because they must pay the expenses and abide by the laws that illegals are exempt from (due to being “under the table”).
I meant to say that the system is the problem, and that we cannot talk of loving people as a reason why we ought to continue to justify such a system. What would be loving is to dismantle the system, even if that means tackling the apparently taboo question of why we are not allowing more people to come in legally.



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ben

posted October 9, 2010 at 12:02 pm


I have respected Colbert ever since the Correspondents Dinner where he spoke truth to the President about his destructive policies. The lack of applause or laughter was indicative of the fact that many of the powerful people including journalists in the room were offended on behalf of the President as well as themselves. He shamed journalists generally for not doing their job which includes asking tough questions of the President.
A similar dynamic is at work here, where Colbert’s jokes were aimed at the hypocrisy of the majority of politicians who have no real interest in migrant farm worker (who will not help them get reelected). Their deflection was to not laugh and to call Colbert inappropriate for supposedly joking at the expense of this issue which they professed to be concerned about. Colbert’s quotation of scripture out of character and the fact that he teaches Sunday school suggests to me where his heart really is.



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kim

posted April 1, 2011 at 4:41 pm


I agree with everyone about Mr.Colbert.He is a very good example of a thinking Catholic.He quotes the Bible at will,something not alot of us can do,including myself.He’s silly and yet makes sense at the same time.Good for him for not being afraid to show and be proud of his Catholicism.



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