The Deacon's Bench

The Deacon's Bench


U.S. Air Force creates Wiccan worship space

posted by jmcgee

Evidently, Wiccans form the largest non-Christian faith in the Air Force. Now they’ll have a place to call their own:

The U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado will set aside a worship space for followers of “Earth-centered” religions such as Wicca and Druidism, according to an Air Force news release.

A stone circle atop a hill on the base in Colorado Springs will likely be dedicated in a ceremony March 10, according to the release, and be available to cadets and other service members who live in the area. The base already has worship spaces for Protestants, Catholics, Muslims and Buddhist, the release said.

The Air Force has been accused of allowing evangelical officers to openly proselytize and pressure cadets of other faiths. In 2005, the Air Force issued new guidelines pledging to “accommodate free exercise of religion and other personal beliefs.”

Tech. Sgt. Brandon Longcrier, who worked with academy officials to create the space, said in the news release, “there really haven’t been any obstacles for the new circle. The chaplain’s office has been 100 percent supportive.”

Longcrier, who became a pagan in 2006, said “when I first arrived here, Earth-centered cadets didn’t have anywhere to call home. Now, they meet every Monday night, they get to go on retreats, and they have a stone circle.”



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Brian

posted January 31, 2010 at 10:32 am


I don’t personally put much stock in Wicca, but it is good that those that practice this belief have a place to worship. Wiccans have had many difficulties in getting recognition of their religion, especially in the military.



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Holly Kline

posted January 31, 2010 at 11:34 am


As a Wiccan woman, I’m delighted to see increasing recognition and tolerance of my faith. Having a stone circle is a wonderful way to honor the beliefs of pagans in the military. Kudos!



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Paul from Michigan

posted January 31, 2010 at 1:50 pm


So let me get this right…the Air Force Academy is accommodating the faiths of Druidism and Wicca, (which is fine by me) but the armed services still cannot get over their knee-jerk denial of equal rights to homosexuals? “Gays” are still more dangerous to the military, whether Christian or no, than the “heathens”?



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wayne

posted January 31, 2010 at 1:55 pm


Yes, the US was founded for religios freedom. For christianity. We dont persecute people because of thier religion. But we allow muslims and athiests and whatnot to sue Jesus out of public life. Try going to a muslim country and sueing to have Allah taken out of the classroom.Muslims and others start crying and beating drums if a politician says something they think is suspect. Go to a muslim contry, and you better not even let them know you are christian.We need to do that here.Do your false religon thing and shut up! Be glad we dont do to you what you would do to us in your country. Now wiccans want to pray and dance to satan on govt property. It just never stops



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Dillon

posted January 31, 2010 at 2:17 pm


Wayne, though I practice through Methodism in the Christian tradition, I have studied earth centered and other world religions in some depth. I think you should learn more about Wicca and Druid practice before you think they “dance to Satan on govt property.” Earth centered religion has its’ place in today’s world every bit as much as any other practice. Notice the term practice, NOBODY is perfect, that’s why it’s all PRACTICE! Frankly, I’m proud of the Air Force for honoring some of the oldest remaining practices, right there along with American Indian tradition.



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wayne

posted January 31, 2010 at 2:42 pm


Bro Dillion, thanks for your honest reply. Heres my honest reply; there is only one name under heaven whereby men can be saved. That name is Jesus. If you are not following Jesus, then who are you following. The saved dont practice religion. We follow the shepard.And he has a staff that he hits you with every now and then. …thy rod and thy staff they comfort me. They leadeth me to still waters. when you look into the earth, you behold darkness and evil. That is stated in the old testament. Try asking Jesus to show himself to you Dillion. thanks



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Kauko

posted January 31, 2010 at 2:44 pm


“Yes, the US was founded for religios freedom. For christianity.”
Really, wayne, this country was only founded on religious freedom for Christians only? George Washington would seem to disagree with you as he wrote this to a Jewish community in Rhode Island during his presidency:
“The Citizens of the United States of America
have a right to applaud themselves for having given to
mankind examples of an enlarged and liberal policy: a
policy worthy of imitation. All possess alike liberty of
conscience and immunities of citizenship. It is now no
more that toleration is spoken of, as if it was by the
indulgence of one class of people, that another enjoyed
the exercise of their inherent natural rights. For happily
the Government of the United States, which gives
to bigotry no sanction, to persecution no assistance
requires only that they who live under its protection
should demean themselves as good citizens, in giving it
on all occasions their effectual support…. May the
children of the Stock of Abraham, who dwell in this land,
continue to merit and enjoy the good will of the other
Inhabitants; while every one shall sit in safety under
his own vine and figtree, and there shall be none to make
him afraid. May the father of all mercies scatter light
and not darkness in our paths, and make us all in our several
vocations useful here, and in his own due time and way
everlastingly happy.”



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Kaylan

posted January 31, 2010 at 4:35 pm


Just another sign of the evil times. I am guessing it is female cadets/officers pushing it, as most people I know who are into wiccan religion are women (not men). And despite it’s nature-loving/earth appeal, it IS related to the occult and there should be no deception about that. It is ashame that the Air Force whom many regard as top-notch of all the military, have stooped so low. Pagan pleasers they have become. How sick is that.



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Helen

posted January 31, 2010 at 5:17 pm


Wayne, Kaylan, you both need to open up your minds. This is a world of diversity, and you must accept that. Learn the truth about a religion before you open your mouth. Wicca is not evil, does not worship Satan. That is the truth, whether you want it to be or not. I think it is a wonderful thing that the Air Force is recognizing this severely misunderstood religion. Everyone in the world, not just Christians, deserves the right of religious freedom. You can’t go around forcing your views on others. It is a very disrespectful and ignorant thing to do. You can’t expect everyone to agree with you, and you can’t condemn those who don’t. You can’t call a religion “false” or “deceptive” just because it’s not yours. Please stop your prejudice.



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Fr. Ericq

posted January 31, 2010 at 6:00 pm


Wiccan has been accepted as something worthy of notation on a dog tag, so, the argument is a little late. However, the practice of Wiccan or Druidism, etc, reveals the human/anthropological need for some sort of religious ritual in life. Nevertheless, Wiccan does not embrace the Incarnation, as Christians believe and Jews hope for. The history of Western Civilization entails the evangelization of those who worshiped the creature over the Creator. Wiccan is adigression of the human person as it will deny philosophical truths. The practice of any earth worship or eco-religion reveals that there are no abolutes, or a supreme being who is above all (Declaration of Independence acknowledges). What does this mean for America? For those who rule and govern? If the spirit world of creatures, beasts of the field or the moon, are equal to that of the human person;then, all is debased. Human rights are already disappearing, and the great experiment we call America is passing away. The practice of Wiccan will not support the principles of a country which once recognized that rights come from a supreme being, “nature’s God” (Declaration of Independence).



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Brian

posted January 31, 2010 at 6:10 pm


Our freedom of religion is not just for Christians, it is for all faiths. I believe that Christ is the only savior, but everyone has the right to not believe that. The establishment clause in the First Amendment was put there to keep religious nuts out of the government, and I thank God every day that it is there. It keeps the same people who think Pat Robertson’s brand of “christianity” is how this nation should be run. It’s not. Intolerance, and how it divides people, is what is keeping more people from joining the Church.



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Kauko

posted January 31, 2010 at 6:11 pm


“Nevertheless, Wiccan does not embrace the Incarnation, as Christians believe and Jews hope for.”
On behalf of all Jews, I am here to tell you that no Jews are waiting for any ‘Incarnation’.



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omega0509

posted January 31, 2010 at 6:24 pm


Kauko, you must not know your own religion well. The Old testament is full of prophesy and hope for Emmanuel, or God with us…i.e. Incarnation.
While I have many problems with the Wicca “religion”, I do respect their constitutional right to the free expression or religion. At least they are not booting Catholics out of the chapel to make room. Catholics are already relegated to the basement of the Chapel, along with Jews. Us Catholics and our Jewish brethren may take solace in that we must be the closest to the truth, since we follow the most universally hated religions.



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Jesus Wept

posted January 31, 2010 at 7:10 pm


Well that’s just great. There went 2,000 years of progress.
Call it what you want, but there is nothing new about it.



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Kauko

posted January 31, 2010 at 7:14 pm


Yeah, I must not have learned anything about my own religion in that decade I spent in college as a Religious Studies major focusing on Biblical Hebrew and reading your ‘Old Testament’ every day in the original language. Such a generic statement as ‘God is with us’ in now way means in a physical body. The fact is that the Jewish religion has never in any way looked for any physical incarnation of God on earth. Jews have traditionally awaited for a human (not divine) messiah. You seem to be conflating Christian interpretation of the Hebrew Bible with the Jewish religion. The two are entirely different things. You’re basically saying that I am ignorant of my own religion because I do not accept yours. You seem to be the one who needs to learn what Judaism is about.



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Petty

posted January 31, 2010 at 8:09 pm


From the dictionary: incarnation: a particular physical form or state (that includes human)
Arguments that boil down to semantics rarely contribute anything worthwhile.
Along those lines:
“no Jews are waiting for any ‘Incarnation’.”
“Jews have traditionally awaited for a human (not divine) messiah”
This implies that not-traditional Jews are awaiting a divine messiah, which contradicts the prior, all-encompassing, statement.
Try not to be so angry.



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Fr Eric

posted January 31, 2010 at 10:16 pm


@ Kauko, Messiah as in anointed one, promised one, but not an Incarnation for the Jews. I typed too fast, sorry to cause you angst.
Clearly, the Incarnation is of Christianity.
Yet, this entire return to the earth, eco-religion, is a denial of monotheism which will be destructive morally and philosophically.
Dt 4: 19; 17:3



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kenneth

posted January 31, 2010 at 11:15 pm


“Human rights are already disappearing, and the great experiment we call America is passing away. The practice of Wiccan will not support the principles of a country which once recognized that rights come from a supreme being, “nature’s God” (Declaration of Independence).”
Ah, yes, the yearning for the long lost glorious past, the revisionist utopia of all conservatives. Which of monotheism’s great principles won’t us Wiccans support? 400 years of slavery, endless imperial wars? The predatory corporate oligarchy which has laid waste to our economy and left us a servile client state of China? State sponsored torture? Yes, I can see where you wouldn’t want 15 centuries of very hard work to be threatened by some hippy New Agers who think the Constitution applies to them!



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Fr Eric

posted February 1, 2010 at 6:21 am


Their has never been an utopia in the USA. Slavery will always be the original sin of America. It seems more clear that the abdication of the legislative branch to a judicial oligarchy has created enormous upheaval and division in this country. Predatory corporations are neither an embodiment of Christianity nor a model for safeguarding the dignity of the human person. US Steele, Planned Parenthood, and misguided Fannie Mae, could all be understood as predatory corporations. The desire of some, the present administration, to dismiss the Declaration of Independence from what is purported to be a “living,” and thus, malleable, Constitution will be the undoing of this country.
The Constitution and Declaration apply to all persons. The question in this discussion is whether or not a religion of “spiritism” or more historically, animism, which animates creatures to have a superhuman power exalting raw power will protect human dignity. In America we are not sure what a human person is. Wiccan will not help with clarity and dignity of the human person.



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Your Name

posted February 1, 2010 at 9:55 am


Where is the military leardership that would permit pagan/satanic worship on military bases of a nation founded and operated on christain principles? This as no basis in our military history. the military should maintain these tools of victory ant not forgo to another…Historically, christain prayer among by civilian and military personnel as been demanded by even our generals to the benefit of victory in our world wars and to the protection of our soldiers. Biblically, this will be a curse upon our military personell for it has been found every soldier adorning trinket, charms, and like to gods other than the one True God are always destroyed in battle against the enemy…whoever introduce this concept wants american soldiers to lose wars…and the enemies of this great nation to prevail…again where is the leadership? pathetic!!!



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RG

posted February 1, 2010 at 10:53 am


Should satanist be allowed to have thier worship place too? Why not, after all, Wiccan is just a manifestation of his rule over the minds of many.



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kenneth

posted February 1, 2010 at 10:59 am


The satanists already have their worship place. It’s called the Pentagon.



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Terry

posted February 1, 2010 at 11:07 am


I say this in all seriousnous. B16 has repeatedly called for religious freedom and tolerance. This was also promoted by Vatican II. My question is why is this really an issue? We cannot promote religious freedom and tolernance and then in the same breath have issues with this. As for me, I am opposed to this completely. But for those who consider themselves faithful obedient Catholics there is a real dichotomy here. We cannot promote religious freedom for some. The Church has historically condemned the concept of total religous freedom for the exact reason this article was posted. Read Sylabus of Errors & Mortalium Animos to name a few. Anyway, ultimately if you are pro-religious freedom and tolerance which you should be if you are a faithful obedient Catholic in the modern sense. Better start figuring out were you stand and be consistant. You cannot have it both ways. Either you support total religious Freedom for all or you don’t. IT canot be for some.



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Lynn

posted February 1, 2010 at 11:33 am


Perhaps the world would be much better off if we each paid more attention to how much and how well we lived according to what we claim to believe, than we do to what we think other folks believe and how they conduct their worship.
Just a thought….



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John

posted February 1, 2010 at 11:53 am


Not sure if Kenneth was just being sarcastic or stating what he really believes, but as a retired Master Sergeant in the Army, I’m offended that he would label the Pentagon the worship place for satanists. I have many good friends who work there who would also take offense at this.



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michael cole

posted February 1, 2010 at 11:57 am


Lynn, while there is a grain of truth in what you say, we still cannot bury our collective heads in the sand when evil surfaces. It was Sir Edmund Burke who said, “The only thing necessary for evil to triumph in the world is for good people to do nothing.”
Apathy is not a virtue.
Just a thought.
Folks interested in this subject should also visit La Salette Journey Blog. Excellent post Deacon. God bless you sir.



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Alan

posted February 1, 2010 at 12:44 pm


Wicca is hardly a religion. It is a bunch of disenfrancised young men and women who cant get a date on Friday night and stand around a circle mumbling to themselves. How far is this “accomodation” PC crap going to get?



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Jason

posted February 1, 2010 at 1:22 pm


Terry you are confused. Religious freedom as defined by the council has absolutely NOTHING to do with accommodating pagan religions. I quote Dignitatis Humanae (the VII document on religious freedom):
“Religious freedom, in turn, which men demand as necessary to fulfill their duty to worship God, has to do with [b]immunity from coercion in civil society. Therefore it leaves untouched traditional Catholic doctrine on the moral duty of men and societies toward the true religion and toward the one Church of Christ[/b].”
Setting up a place for the confused to endanger their souls by practicing pagan nonsense is NOT sanctioned by the Catholic Church.
And nowhere does the silly liberal term “tolerance” appear in the VII document on religious freedom.
I suggest you read a copy of Dignitatis Humanae instead of the liberal drivel you’ve been obviously absorbing.



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Yan Petrovsky

posted February 1, 2010 at 1:37 pm


It’s true: in the US freedom of religion is for everyone, Wiccans included.
I can’t think of a better way to demonstrate that freedom of religion, understood that way, is a heresy. Does any Christian out there think that God is pleased when the law sanctions and promotes the worship of demons?
Think it over. The freedom of religion concept could use some tinkering.
Cathaliban



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Lynn

posted February 1, 2010 at 1:47 pm


Michael,
I know well what the good Edmund Burke had to say. But you’ll have to go a good distance to convince me that Wicca, in and of itself, is evil. From my point of view, perhaps the beliefs are wrong, but it doesn’t make the people or the beliefs evil. Individuals and their behavior may well be a different story, but there’s no shortage of evil folks proclaiming Christianity, either. And, again, I think the world at large would be a better place if we paid more attention to minding the logs in our own eyes, than we do to the splinter in the next person’s.
Do not confuse my sense of what is and is not my business with apathy. A Wiccan going about his life making a contribution to society and refraining from harming others is no threat to me or the world, any more than a Jew or Buddhist.



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Kauko

posted February 1, 2010 at 3:29 pm


Petty, your really bad attempt at trying to dismiss my argument with bad logic doesn’t change the facts here. Fact: one of the major points of diversion between Judaism and Christianity is that Judaism doesn’t accept Jesus (or any other person past or to come) as being an incarnate God. I’m sorry, you can make your self feel clever all you want by trying to catch contradictions in my words but it doesn’t alter this fact. And I am not so angry as you would make me out to be, but if I were it would be justified as the comment to which you replied, I made replying to someone who patronizingly belittled my knowledge of my own religion (a religion I have spent my whole adult life studying intensely). How would you feel were I to claim that you knew nothing of your own religion, especially if I were not even a member of your own religion?
As for the tone of all most of the comments made here, it makes me feel so discouraged that this country is populated by such people. You all obviously seem to want to throw religious freedom out the window and make this country a theocracy. I’m sorry to tell you that this country is not founded on Catholic dogma. You don’t get to pick and choose which religions get freedom and dismiss others. Religious freedom is either for all religions or it is meaningless. All the reasons I’ve seen offered here for why this Wiccan worship space should not be made are based solely on the limited opinions of specific religious points of views. But that is not how this country works. If there is to be any argument against it, it has to come from a rational, objective base and not ‘I’m against it because me religion says Wicca is evil’. An individual has every right to believe that Wicca is evil because their religion teaches that, but policy in this country cannot be based on such an argument.



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Your Name

posted February 1, 2010 at 3:47 pm


“How would you feel were I to claim that you knew nothing of your own religion, especially if I were not even a member of your own religion?”
well, if petty is a Roman Catholic and an American, you’d have a better than 50-50 chance of being right.
Really, what you’re objecting to isn’t the misinformation about Judaism, but how insulted you feel because someone said you were wrong.
Get used to it. Especially if you plan to marry. ;-)



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Martin

posted February 1, 2010 at 3:49 pm


Lynn,
You seem to be falling into the typical secular PC attitude that “It’s all OK.” Wicca is not OK, it’s evil. One of the central ‘themes’ of wicca is the practice of magic; that is black magic (and don’t try to say that they practice white magic, there is no such thing). Wiccans try to tap into a supernatural power so as to gain power over others, nature, illness, have knowledge of the future etc. When they tap into this power they end up, intentionally or not, calling on demons to come to their aid. “All practices of magic or sorcery, by which one attempts to tame occult powers, so as to place them at one’s service and have a supernatural power over others – even if this were for the sake of restoring their health – are contrary to the virtue of religion.” CCC 2117. Doing these things is by no means good.



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Paul

posted February 1, 2010 at 4:01 pm


This policy is yet one more sign of the decline of Western civilization. By its very nature, the Wiccan/Druid belief system has no place in the US Military.



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Maggie

posted February 1, 2010 at 4:21 pm


So, for Haiti it was voodoo and we see what happened there. So now it is wiccan for tbe US. Wonder what will happen here…..



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kenneth

posted February 1, 2010 at 4:37 pm


So it’s degenerating into whose religion is “evil.” Ok. Whose faith has run an international pedophilia ring, sanctioned at the highest institutional levels, for 50+ years? (hint, not Wiccan). Which one sanctioned slavery and genocide over an entire hemisphere? Which one maintained a holy office and system of courts employing torture to “correct” thought crimes? If Wiccans don’t belong in the military, maybe all of you Christian hard guys and your kids can volunteer to go and take the ambush or IED blasts in their place. What’s that I’m hearing…..crickets?
I guess what you’re really proposing is that non-Christian soldiers are good enough to use for cannon fodder, but not good enough to be able to exercise the rights they are fighting to protect. Sort of like we used to do with black soldiers and the Brits did with their Sepoys. Or perhaps that all of us with “impure” beliefs be segregated out of the military and government entirely. Perhaps you’d like us to wear yellow pentagrams on our sleeves for easy identification and have separate walled quarters in the city?



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John Ansley

posted February 1, 2010 at 4:38 pm


At La Salette Journey, Paul Melanson raises an interesting point regarding participation in Wicca violating both a DoD Directive and Air Force Instruction. He makes a very good point.



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Your Name

posted February 1, 2010 at 4:42 pm


People who delve into these practices (this is not a religion) will reap the consequences of their idolotry. Anyone who follows this wiccan practice invites negative influences(evil) upon themselves and those around them not protected by the Holy Spirit. Hopefully for their sake they will be enlightend by the spirit of truth before it is too late for their souls and be completely engulfed by darkness. They will not be able to say they have not been warned when they find themselves trapped by the evil one when they discover it is the evil one that they follow. A very scary scenario to be practicing this stuff in the Air Force. They are just inviting calamity.



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Kauko

posted February 1, 2010 at 5:04 pm


“Really, what you’re objecting to isn’t the misinformation about Judaism, but how insulted you feel because someone said you were wrong.”
I can honestly say I’m objecting to both. I have quite a prejudice about people spreading misinformation, especially about something I care for deeply. I also won’t deny that my reaction was motivated by someone saying I was wrong, as the way in which the person went about saying I was wrong was patronizing and disregarding of the fact that I speak from a position of years of study and knowledge about the subject and not from ignorance. If I couldn’t handle someone disagreeing with me I would never make any comments online because, let’s be honest, saying anything on the internet is begging someone to come along and disagree.



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Jason

posted February 1, 2010 at 5:34 pm


That’s right, Kenneth. Overlook the TRUTH that is the One, Holy, CATHOLIC, and Apostolic Church and instead focus on some of the filthy priests who infiltrated her. You do so at the peril of meeting some of those very same priests after you leave this world.
And Lynn, the “I’m ok you’re ok” is the devil’s lies.
A wiccan who spends his life not being a threat to you is nonetheless bound to hell if he does not reject his pagan practice, repent, and embrace Jesus Christ.
That is simply the TRUTH, put forth out of love and charity. Nobody wants any wiccan in hell. It’s up to you, though.



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michael cole

posted February 1, 2010 at 5:49 pm


Kenneth, are you serious? International pedophile ring? You are accusing the Catholic Church of criminal conspiracy? That argument didn’t wash when attorney Daniel Shea tried it and Catholics like Paul Melanson refuted it. Read his Blog posts on attorney Daniel Shea or do a Google search of attorney Daniel Shea. Shame on you Kenneth.



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Carol Earl

posted February 1, 2010 at 9:13 pm


Letting evil in?? I am sorry Holy Mary and Redeemer JESUS



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kenneth

posted February 1, 2010 at 9:52 pm


By what stretch of fantasy would it NOT be considered a criminal conspiracy? Yes, it was a decided minority of priests, but this was not something that caught the hierarchy unawares. Many, many of these cases came to their attention over the decades. Their response, without fail, was to shield the suspects from prosecution, move them to another location and put them in a position to re-offend, and intimidate victims and witnesses. In other cases, documents and perpetrators were spirited out of the country under the guise of the church’s status as a sovereign nation.
This is textbook RICO stuff. If any one of us or any other organization on Earth did half of this business these days, we’d all be facing centuries of jail time, and every last crumb of assets would be seized. The fact that this hasn’t happened is evidence of dumb luck, not innocence. They were able to run the clock out on statutes of limitations, a number of key suspects died of old age, and no prosecutor has had the political backbone to take on a bishop and risk alienating what is still a strong constituency in many major cities.
If evil is judged on action rather than doctrine (as most people measure things), the RCC arguably should not be allowed to practice on military bases. Fortunately, thank God (Yahweh and Cernunnos), our government isn’t allowed to arbitrate that. Even though I find much of Catholicism to be repugnant to my conscience and formally defected from the church, I would never presume to prevent others from practicing it, especially those serving our country. By the same extension, you’re free to tell us we’re all going to hell, but you don’t get to make the U.S. government the temporal enforcement wing of Rome or your own personal beliefs.



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Jason

posted February 1, 2010 at 10:48 pm


Say hello to the homosexual priests and the bishops who enabled them in the afterlife, Kenneth. You guys can get together between teeth gnashing and discuss how much you abhor the truth revealed by Christ and embodied in his Holy Catholic Church (1Tm3:15).
Their filthy crimes are made worse by the fact that they turned souls like you away from the truth of the Church. Don’t let them drag you with them. That, after all, is the intent of the ultimate author of their treachery.



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Johh

posted February 1, 2010 at 11:00 pm


As I read all the commentary thus far, I’m struck by a few glaring issues:
1. I, a former USAF officer and a practicing Roman Catholic, take grave offense at many of the accusations leveled thus far. Most military personnel I’ve met are wonderful, professional, admirable people. Most of the Catholics and Christians I’ve met–who take their faith seriously–are wonderful, admirable people as well. Don’t even THINK about asking me to honor your views if you willfully distort truth and/or exploit human errors to justify blatant bigotry!
2. In our press for “diversity”, we’ve severely neglected traditional values and beliefs. It hasn’t been pretty.
3. This discussion deals with religious practice, not slavery, so I’ll only say this: Branding slavery as America’s original sin is intellectually dishonest, historically inaccurate, and potentially willfully misleading.
4. While one could make similar arguments regarding Christian faiths, I’ve long thought of Wicca or pagan worship as being intensely pacifistic. I’ll be curious to see how the UCMJ deals with failure to follow orders due to “conscientious objector” views.
5. Most minorities, once they’ve gained political clout, will tend to wield a degree of political power to pursue a goal, often contradicting what they claimed they’d believe. If the Wiccans and pagans start “proselytizing” (or whatever term they use), will the UCMJ insist on the same standards for them as for Christians? Or will political pressure incline those in charge to turn a blind eye?
6. Wiccans and others will not intentionally worship Satan or demons. HOWEVER..I’ve read some of the Wiccan Reed and other writings. They contain some truth, but are not THE Truth. Because of this, I have to declare that I believe them to be fallen faiths, thus intrinsically evil. In the current politically correct climate, I wonder if anyone will be allowed to offer that sort of critique without being condemned.
God help us all!



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Brian

posted February 1, 2010 at 11:52 pm


Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof…
This is the First Amendment to our Constitution. In a government institution, if you allow one religion, you must allow all religions. And John, I’m sorry, but you can’t lump a whole group of people as evil. It’s not your place to judge. There’s only one who has that right. Are some Wiccans evil? Probably, but there have been plenty of people who claimed to worship Christ who have turned out to be evil. Some of which have been leaders in the Church. Closed minded bigotry is killing the faith.



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Gene

posted February 2, 2010 at 12:07 am


I find it amusing that a small area dedicated to a simple stone arrangement can get people so worked up. If it were instead called a work of art, would people care? Probably.



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John

posted February 2, 2010 at 12:43 am


Brian,
Hard to tell precisely where you’re coming from, but I’ll offer these thoughts.
First, I have not lumped a whole group of people as evil, nor have I judged anyone in the sense of final condemnation, nor have I even cast doubt on anything or anyone based on blind bigotry. I have, for my thinking, done precisely the opposite.
The First Amendment effectively requires me to honor someone else’s religious beliefs to a great degree. It ALSO requires others to honor MY beliefs to a great degree. The latter rarely happens. If anything, Judeo-Christian beliefs are dismissed or condemned for being..what they are, because they don’t conform well to a frequent demand for moral relativism.
I have not declared that anyone will go to hell, or that this is the death of the Academy, or anything else. I have though, challenged whether the change at the Academy will truthfully enhance that community, or whether it’ll become a source of division. Given the statements I’ve read thus far, I suspect it’ll be the latter; the language of those who support this strongly hints at an intent to fully live out their “rights” as they see them, and everyone else be damned. (Figuratively, of course.)
I find that to be completely objectionable and I think there’s ample cause for saying so.



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james

posted February 2, 2010 at 1:18 am


i say good job.. there is not just one path to the truth christian, pagan, jewish, all believe in a higher power and that is what matters



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Your Name

posted February 2, 2010 at 1:29 am


Fascinating comments. I agree with Fr. Eric in that Druidism and wiccan practices are pre-Christian and gave way under the revelation of the Redeemer. St. Patrick can be credited with much of the conversion that took place in Druid Ireland, not because of pressure, but because the claims of Druid practitioners were found to not hold up under the revelation of the Redeemer. I know that is not accepted by those who do not have faith in that revelation. However, that is historical. Natural religious practices tried to explain the divine mysteries that could not be explained in the primitive cultures where they were practiced. But when the Christians came to give them the good news and mysteries that could not be explained away and/or shown to be more powerful than the pagan gods , conversions began and a new world (western civilization, as an example) began. Yet, all people who claim to live by Christian beliefs do not live well in their beliefs and so the world sees horrible behaviors from those who claim to be christian. Christ tells us this will be the way of things until He comes a second time. Living together with different beliefs are the American way. Yet claiming that all ideas are equal is truth cannot be sustained by logic. Some ideas conform to objective reality more perfectly than others and the hope is that in searching for Truth, we will submit ourselves to it and conform our lives to living in that Truth.



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Bruce Stewart

posted February 2, 2010 at 2:00 am


Well it is about time,
I personally have been Wiccan for more years than I can count. I guess you could call me the old guard long before the new age. I know all about living my religion underground. I know all about persecution. The Wiccan religion originally was as it was intended to be “The religion of the wise”,Our Wiccan ancestors were the doctors and herbalist and religious leaders of their communities. If you do hardly any studying at all you will find that especially the christian religious orders plagerized most of their original holidays from pagan holidays and even went so far trying to bury all signs of Wiccan and pagan earth based religions as to build their sacred churches on the very top of our own sacred sights and circles.
Yes Wiccans and most all pagans can be very passive and loving people but make no mistake about their ability to serve and protect with undying loyalty for a purpose, country, or way of life that serves all Wiccans or otherwise and deeply respects the earth and all her inhabitants.
Blessed Be



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John

posted February 2, 2010 at 3:24 am


Well, I guess Bruce’s comments are to be expected.
If one believes in Wicca, you’ll probably view various evangelistic efforts and actions by Christians as “plagiarism” or what-not.
Even so, I can’t agree with the implied conclusion. I don’t believe Christian efforts in the past aimed at maliciously harming people–at least not exclusively, as is implied. I believe such efforts intended to bring people to love God and celebrate His truth. If someone else chooses to interpret that in a more vicious light, should I really be surprised? Christ himself warned us that we’d be hated for preaching the Good News or His name.
Ultimately, I don’t know that I object to the Academy building some sort of worship space for pagans, though I cannot truthfully say that I find it admirable. At best, I might view it much the same way as I might the fire ring at Boy Scout camp where I went through the OA (Order of the Arrow) tap-out ceremony. I don’t believe in Native spirituality any more then than now, but that wasn’t quite the point. The virtues that were proposed, though imperfect, were still a goal that anyone should pursue.
I suspect this has sparked so much discussion because we’re all waiting to see what will happen next. Will the Academy be genuinely diverse and truly honor ALL faith traditions? Or will they, as so often happens these days, quietly neglect traditional values in favor of a more “inclusive” and “nondiscriminatory” philosophy?
Time will tell.



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Joe Blow

posted February 2, 2010 at 9:50 am


Why cant people of all religions practice their faith off campus? That will avoid all the issues relating to religion. because of this they will have to build all sorts of things to cover EVERY religion.



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MICHAEL

posted February 2, 2010 at 11:04 am


I do not understand the reason why the Deacon took they time to write the article. I am not familiar with Belief net–but aren’t you going to COMMENT or advise the reader at ALL as to the seriousness of this decision in the lives of the cadets and servicemen….their predicament in calling upon paganism, which (really Deacon, do you know your responsibilities or what?) puts their eternal safety at serious risk? What’s the point? Is belief now merely a flavor-of-the-day and taken so un-seriously that people–especially those who may be in harm’s way one day soon–are unschooled by those who know better? What is your job anyway, Deacon? WHAT is your job? Are you a reporter, a NEWS man? I know “it’s their decision”, but really..NO comment? How bland! Worse, how poor of your decision not to inoculate some sense into the piece. How weak of you not to do your REAL job. Next someone will be writing about lukewarm deacons. Hoh-hum…



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Mary Smith

posted February 2, 2010 at 11:12 am


The Air Force Academy is right to provide for Protestants, Catholics, and Muslims (and they should also provide for Jews). However encouraging Buddhists and Pagans in the military is not a good idea. Soldiers are afterall being taught to kill, and pacifist religions will only undermine military effectivness.



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JMWQueen

posted February 2, 2010 at 11:29 am


A fascinating discussion. I have a few areas of concern for those who profess the Church has had only good intentions.
- Where does the Inquisition come into play? How many ‘heretics’ (read, those who believed outside the doctrines of Rome) lost their lives for those beliefs? Cathars, druids, Arian Christians, midwives, women of education, Jews, etc etc? They were labeled ‘evil’ by the Church because they did not fall in line.
- Where do the roads to faith and political power diverge in the Church? The common man is quite different from the Ecclesiastical(sp) powers that be.
All faiths return to ancient history, including Wicca. Belief systems evolve based on cultural realities and the interpretations of those in power.
As an esoteric Christian, I believe Truths have, over the centuries, been lost in the name of truth. I am open to all possibilities, as there reside mysteries in all.



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Lynn

posted February 2, 2010 at 11:38 am


Martin,
I am not saying ‘It’s all OK.’ I am saying that you’ll have to go some distance to convince me. Simply quoting the Catechism doesn’t get you there, particularly when the context is the propriety of the federal government acknowledging a particular faith system. In such a case, the standard for prohibiting something is very, very high. Human sacrifice is up there; animal sacrifice may be. That sort of thing. More generally, you’d probably have to show direct, objective harm to people or someone else’s property. Show me such on a systematic basis and you’ll convince me.
Mary, an inevitable consequence of religious freedom in this country is that in situations like this, one’s personal opinion of the faith system in question is simply not relevant. And the government is not allowed to have an opinion on the topic. You may not be aware that not so many years ago, the Air Force Academy had a major problem with evangelical Christian cadets and officers harassing other cadets – Jewish, Catholic, and all others – about their faith. I graduated from a service academy, and _that_ sort of activity is deeply corrosive, far, far more than providing a place for a [by the way, very small] different sort of faith to conduct their worship. Buddhists and pagans are no more encouraged than any other faith group. The services make accommodations – use of space, and the provision of some consumables, if needed – for people who hold those beliefs to practice them. In short, Buddhists, pagans, and others are allowed to conduct their worship on the same terms as Jews, Christians, and Muslims.
As to what someone else said about ‘speaking the truth in love’ [usually code for verbally smacking folks who think differently than we want them to, in my observation], well, I’m much in favor of the quote attributed to St. Francis: “Preach the gospel always. Use words if you must.” I rather doubt that smacking, even verbally, the Wiccans around me is going to persuade them to convert to Christianity. On the other hand, if I live my faith rather than harangue people about it, we might just open up a conversation.
Joe B: going off base to worship is not always possible. The Air Force Academy gate is about 7 miles from the cadet area, and most cadets don’t have cars or ready accesss to rides.



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Ashlayne

posted February 2, 2010 at 1:59 pm


@Michael: How do you know what you believe is right, hmm? Have you been there? Can you prove it to me?
@Mary: Just because someone is pagan or Buddhist, it doesn’t always mean they’re pacifist. In addition, there are roles in the military that don’t involve killing or harming others. Ever heard of field medics?
I, for one, am thrilled at the mention of this article. As someone else mentioned, the government has no right to interfere in anyone’s religious beliefs. It’s a little something called separation of Church and State.



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Kauko

posted February 2, 2010 at 7:51 pm


I’m kind of amused that a few people have suggested that Paganism shouldn’t be recognized by the military because it is a pacifistic religion. Those of you who said this really need to get your facts straight here. Paganism, like most religions, is home to diverse opinions on any number of topics. Yes, there are pacifistic Pagans just as there are pacifistic Christians (Quakers, for instance). There are also a large number of Pagans who feel strongly in joining the military and defending their country.



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John

posted February 2, 2010 at 7:54 pm


Three thoughts:
1. Questioning the role of potentially pacifistic persons at the Air Force Academy is completely appropriate. There are indeed noncombatant roles in the military, but they are a comparative small number. I’m well aware that many people don’t want to admit it, but the Academy is intended to train people to engage in warfare, an action that inherently involves non-pacifistic intentions.
2. Separation of Church and State is a fallacy that needs to be confronted sooner or later. The Church and the State need to be mutually beneficial, not separated from each other. The Church provides a culture that the State cannot, while the State provides an environment in which the Church can persist.
Issues like this have come up many times these past 50 years in no small part because of the willful neglect of this principle.



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John

posted February 2, 2010 at 7:55 pm


Whoops! I had thought I might provide three comments, but I wound up with only two. I have lost my ability to count, I merely wasn’t quite complete in my editing.
My bad.



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John

posted February 2, 2010 at 8:06 pm


I remembered my other thought, though it’s mostly an extension of one of my previous:
Church and State both have a need to be accountable to each other to a certain degree. The State needs to be able to intervene in an otherwise Church-related matter in which the health and safety of persons, animals, or objects are placed at risk in an abusive fashion, or will be very soon. At the same time, the Church needs to be able to educate the State with regard to what moral scruples need to be.
If those two are not complementary, no book of law will enable the State to exist for any worthwhile amount of time.
As mentioned before though, that balance has long tended to be neglected or even willfully ignored.



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Kauko

posted February 2, 2010 at 8:17 pm


“1. Questioning the role of potentially pacifistic persons at the Air Force Academy is completely appropriate”
Yes, John, but those making that point here are falsely claiming that Paganism is pacifistic which it is not neccesarily. There are pacifist Pagans and there are very pro-military Pagans. And obviously, the pacifists aren’t signing up for military service. The Pagans in the military are obviously the non-pacifist ones, so the whole argument is pointless.



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Carl

posted February 2, 2010 at 10:25 pm


Jews, Muslims, Protestants, and Pagans are all the same as far as Catholics should be concerned. However, modern Catholics can’t seem to bend over backwards far enough for jews, so quit complaining about giving space to Pagans.



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kenneth

posted February 2, 2010 at 10:54 pm


There is nothing inherently pacifist about Wicca or any other pagan path I am aware of. In fact we have rich traditions of warriorhood and and gods and goddesses rooted in those aspects of creation (and destruction). Some paths are rooted in the old Norse religions which held death in battle as the only end truly befitting a man. We probably produce more environmentalists and vegetarians than some of the mainstream religions, but no great number of pacifists. There are pagan veterans organizations and military ministries. At the link below you can see some of those who have served. I would commend your attention in particular to Sgt. Patrick Stewart, who died in combat in Afghanistan.
http://www.circlesanctuary.org/ministries/military/veteransridge.html



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Leanne

posted February 3, 2010 at 8:26 am


Kauko,
you are absolutely right, and it should be quite obvious even for a Christian ( if he reads the Gospels, of course) that claiming to be the son of God is blasphemy for Jews.



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Lili of the field

posted February 3, 2010 at 8:45 am


It is sad to see how some Catholics are bringing up the dusty old devil argument against yet another religion. In the past Jews, Muslims, Buddhists, Hinduists, Taoists have been on the receiving side of the devil punch.
Sad sad …



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Kauko

posted February 3, 2010 at 3:40 pm


I’m sure all the people here who were against the Wiccan worship site will be pleased to find out that it has already been desecrated by Chrisitians….



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Lili of the field

posted February 4, 2010 at 7:27 am


Kauko,
please say more and cite your sources: Christian vandalizing a pagan worship site? where did we see that before?



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Deacon Greg Kandra

posted February 4, 2010 at 8:00 am


Here’s what the LA TIMES is reporting:
http://www.latimes.com/news/nation-and-world/la-na-wicca3-2010feb03,0,3367750.story
Somebody placed a wooden cross against one of the rocks. Does that rise to the level of a “desecration”? Something like this, perhaps, which is clearly and obviously an act of violence and hate. That’s desecration. But a cross on a rock??



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kenneth

posted February 4, 2010 at 10:42 am


The level of physical vandalism, or lack thereof, is not the issue. When you go into someone else’s sacred space like that with an attitude of clear contempt and disrespect, that’s desecration. That cross was put there with the same message as the ones they used to set on fire in people’s yards in Mississippi. I guess you could say that technically wasn’t desecration either. “All” they did was place a cross too. A well-lit one to share the light of Christian love, no doubt.



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Deacon Greg Kandra

posted February 4, 2010 at 11:11 am


That cross was put there with the same message as the ones they used to set on fire in people’s yards in Mississippi. I guess you could say that technically wasn’t desecration either. “All” they did was place a cross too.
Sorry, but no. Burning crosses in the south is entirely different — designed to instill fear and terror.
I can’t condone what was done to the Wiccans, but I think it’s a stretch to compare it to cross-burnings.



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kenneth

posted February 4, 2010 at 6:06 pm


If there’s a difference, it’s in degree only. In both instances, the action is motivated by hate, not love. Both cases are a way to send a message that this territory belongs to us, not you, and you’ll play the game by our rules, or else. Did the violator have the intent and will to start actually lynching Wiccans? Probably not, but the thought comes from the same place. If it’s not a big deal, would you or your pastor be OK if they came in Easter Sunday and found a huge pentacle sitting on your altar? I suspect not.
Or if physical damage and imminent threats are the only yardstick of desecration, why is that Catholics got so upset when PZ Meyers had someone filch a consecrated host and drove a nail through it on You Tube? It didn’t materially disrupt anyone’s services or damage a chapel. If the people who did this wanted to share their religion with pagans, there are plenty of ways they could have done that without desecrating their space. The fact that they did not shows they have the same mentality as the guys we fight in the Swat Valley every day.



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Lynn

posted February 5, 2010 at 9:44 am


Deacon Greg,
I understand exactly what you’re saying, but I have to agree with Kenneth on that one. It’s a matter of degree, not kind. A burning cross in the front yard does carry real risk of objective harm that isn’t present with a wooden cross sitting against a rock, but otherwise it’s essentially the same. As such, it should be treated as the same thing, but scaled to the degree of risk involved.
We would all do well to remember that _our_ religious freedoms are only meaningful to the extent that we leave room for other people to have theirs. Our view of their beliefs isn’t relevant to that issue. The only standing for an objection is clearly definable objective harm to persons or property.



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Erin

posted February 11, 2010 at 2:17 am


I intend to join the Air Force when I finish my degree and all I can say is that I am so grateful for the inclusive atmosphere they are cultivating. It is not a bad thing to accept pacifistic religions because as the most highly educated branch of the United States military, many jobs are available that do not involve killing others. Other Wiccans may come to terms with combative roles just as believing ‘thou shalt not kill’ has not hindered service men and women of other faiths. Personally I am studying hard in school so that I may help my country with my knowledge rather than physical force.
I think you guys are worrying way too much; maybe some clarification will help everyone get along better. It is a common phrase in my coven that “all Gods are one God and all Goddesses are one Goddess”. Even the God and Goddess are really only the polar elements of the one true God. Wiccans do not make distinctions between a Christian God, a Jewish God or any other God or Goddess, they are all God and each of us is trying to express that in the manner that resonates deepest with our soul.
Oh, and Wiccans do not worship satan, most Wiccans do not even believe in the devil. All evil in the world stems from within the hearts of man, so the devil is simply metaphorical. We overcome our demons such as stress or social pressures and live a productive life.
Also, magic is what we call prayer. Guess what I do for magic, I do things like envision my friends and loved ones bathed in the healing light of The One. I do not see much difference between this and when my grandmother tells me she has prayed for a guardian angel to watch over me. People who claim to practice ‘black magic’ cannot really call themselves Wiccan. One of our main ‘tenants’ states: an it harm none, do what ye will. Basically we are free to act so long as these actions do not cause harm to others. Black magic would go against this basic principle; it would be like breaking a Commandment yet still claiming you adhere to the respective religion. It is also generally believed that the good or ill you put forth into the world will be amplified and returned to you, similar to the idea of karma. Why would anyone send out bad intentions knowing they will receive something much worse in return?
As for desecration, I often find that my Christian friends are overly friendly with their faith. They talk about it often and even invite me to worship with them, I am certain that it is a major part of their beliefs to spread their ideas. Acceptance does not come over night and they genuinely believe that every person has an immortal soul that needs to be saved. Perhaps with all of the attention this issue has received they will learn the bounds of helpfulness and disrespect.
Finally, please do not bash one another, I know Wicca is not greatly understood but it is not evil just as Christianity and all the other religions are not evil. The church may have done some things society may not agree with today but it is working to improve itself. What is wrong with accepting all paths to divinity?



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Krzysztof

posted February 15, 2010 at 6:56 pm


M.Eliade,History of beliefs@religious ideas-there are about 3000 “faiths”
What does a school, college, university to teach students to discern rationally to chose the right religion? It is 20th century, 26 centuries when Greeks at first demolished myths; Tales,…Aristotle….
There are STRICT SCIENTIFIC: BIBLICAL(HERMENEUTICS OF ANY “HOLY”TEXT)+ THEOLOGY:LOGIC,PHILOSOSPHY,ESP.PHISLSOPHY OF SCIENCE.
Israeli prophets fought the wrong ides of one God!!!Who did not listen…eneded in …fire, famine, swords.Apply the Principle of Induction



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patfromfortworth

posted March 23, 2010 at 5:56 am


Jesus said, “No man comes to the Father except by me,” and “there is no other name under heaven whereby men may be saved.” “I go to prepare a place for you, that where I am, there you may be.” People who revere the earth have no idea how beautiful that place is that Jesus has “prepared for those who love Him.” He said He would never forget us..we are carved into his hand (nail scars). He said He is the good shepherd who’d leave the 99 and go looking for one sheep that’s lost.
I found this site looking to see what Dr. Owour is saying about the earth being torn up by earthquakes, etc. It is for our benefit. Dr. Owour told Haiti, Chile, New Orleans 39-46 days before their calamity, just like Jonah did. Father Yahweh told me, “This is Nineveh we are all in thei together.” So I asked for at least 40 days warning like Nineveh had and they repented. Repentance is the purpose of the warning. If people repented, the prophecy would not have to happen or as in Nineveh, get 40 more years instead of 40 days.
There is a Hell that is very DARK, with “weeping, wailing,and knashing of teeth.” Even to stay away from there, I’d believe and worship Yahweh and Jesus. That’s why I chose Jesus 54 years ago. He has stuck “closer than a brother.” To think that the Great Creator of the Universe knows me and every little problem I have is His. He feels all our pain. IT IS TRUE. If people only knew how much He loves them, they could only love Him back. They surely wouldn’t avoid, ignore, or mock Him. If you read His autobiography, King James Bible you can see. If you see, ask and you can HEAR Him. He thanked me for listening and said He “would talk often with His people, but they won’t have it.” He would solve all the world’s problems, provide all our needs, heal us, satisfy us but the world babbles on, ignoring or mocking Him. It’s so sad. BUT, He will get our attention…real soon. Run to Jesus and “get under his wings.” Ps.91 before the SHAKING COMES. You’ll never regret it..not for all eternity!
He told me his “everlasting arms need not be empty.” There are more people alive now than have every died. So, comparatively, I guess He feels His “arms are empty.” He said He was “not willing that any should perish, but that all should come to a saving knowledge of Him.” Please don’t make Him sad wondering where you are if there is no one praying for you. I love Him and I don’t like to think of Him as so sad. Not only Him, but all the angels in heaven REJOICE at the salvation of one person.
We love you with the love of Jesus and that is why we keep bothering you. It’s just love even if it seems intense. Some people have the spirit of the prophet who must say what God tells him or where He leads him or end up like Jonah in the belly of a whale. The love of Jesus is sometimes confrontational but please see that if we did’t care, you’d never hear from us. The devil is a great Distractor and “pillow prophets” flatter you and tell you you’re all right and/or all is well when it is not.



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Mary Ann Thompson-Frenk

posted July 13, 2010 at 5:40 am


Dear Fr Eric,
you write that: “Wiccan will not help with clarity and dignity of the human person”.
I must respectfully disagree as it has played a large role in what I hope has made me a better person.
I was raised catholic, and yet after my father took my Wiccan books, (Apprentice to Power by Timothy Roderick, Book of Shadows by Phyllis Curott and the work of Scott Cunningham), to make sure I wasn’t being brainwashed into some cult, he told me, “You are simply lifting the veil.” My wiccan altar today has Jesus on it, Mary, Buddha, Kwan Yin, Quetzalcoatl, Quetzalpoptl,etc. – many icons which are gifts from various friends of mine who are religious leaders from over 30 different faiths. Each one of those people has dedicated their lives towards helping others, and while I don’t believe that any one religion can reveal all that The Divine is, including my own, I do see in each of their icons a glimpse of The Divine. Wicca, for me is a means of organizing what I have and will continue to spend a lifetime learning.
As a Wiccan, I believe there is one Great Divine Creator Spirit. But I believe, that just as the Divine imbued you and me with a soul, so did the Divine imbue all of life with its own spirit. To borrow from one of my mentors, Phyllis Curott, think of God as a ceramicist…if in the beginning there was nothing but God, He had to pull from Himself all that he made the world with. Therefore, as Wiccans, we see God in the water, the air, the animals, and in each one of you as a manifested individual soul of free will.
Most Wiccans choose a theology they feel they can relate the most to. For me, Yahweh and the Shekinah/Sophia/Holy Spirit are how I often visualize the male and female aspects of Divinity. The truth is, I wish there was a euphuism for the capitalized “It”, but that pronoun doesn’t seem very respectful, so I just say “The Divine.”
I do not dance naked under a full moon. I do dance fully clothed with spontaneous joy at witnessing The Divine’s Creation of which I am blessed to be a part. I do not worship Satan. I do believe there is evil in the world. I’ve seen the marks it left on the faces of children Rwanda. I am a philanthropist and the founder of two foundations, one which is international and in support of human rights, the environment, interfaith work,
( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S9zZmg2Y55M&feature=player_embedded )
and helping others to become conscious of how they too can make a difference in the world. I’m an artist, activist, and care deeply about helping other people.
I do not want to be a Christian, but I have Christian friends whom I respect deeply, ministers and priests whom I serve on the Board of The New York Interfaith Center with and whom I even employ within my own organization. I also have Native American, Yoruba, Tibetan Buddhist, Ismali Muslim, Baptist, Methodist, Jewish, Orthodox Jewish, Orthodox Christian, and many more friends who are the rabbis, ministers, Imams, Native American Shaman, and leaders of other congregations. We share prayers with each other, find each other’s ways fascinating and support each other’s outreach projects in the local and global communities.
I share all this, because I want you to see one example of a living, breathing, citizen of the United States who is deeply grateful for religious freedom and who strives to help make a positive impact in the world who is also Wiccan.
Please learn more about us before saying our spiritual practice “will not help with the clarity and dignity of the human being. “



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Raven Writes With Air

posted August 3, 2011 at 1:01 am


Ok, I need to make one thing particularly clear. I am a Wiccan, and for the sake of all that is still left in this run down society. WE DON’T WORSHIP SATAN!!!!! Wiccans don’t even believe he exists!!!! All you dipshit haters who think we’re some type of witches sound like millennia old Other dipshits who burn anyone who can bend their finger a bit farther for being a witch… GET IT THROUGH your thick skulls that we have just as many rights to a free religion as you. If you truly feel your religion is the only right one and all hippies, gays, and pagans should be shunned from everything, go pray your little prayers OVER HITLER’S GRAVE!!!!!!



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Pagan

posted November 3, 2011 at 11:40 am


You juat broke Godwins law… Whoever first mentions hitler loses the argument.

I’m a proud pagan, and honestly, I don’t enjoy christian ‘love’ that is very in your face and confrontational. That will drive people away. For those who believe that it is their duty to pass their love of Jesus (or Yahweh, or Allah) to others, including pagans, my advice is simply live your faith out. The closest someone has ever come to converting me (and mind you, it didn’t happen) was when they lived their life that way, and were so happy with it that it intrigued me. I remain brilliant friends with this person to this day. They lived their love of Christ, instead of shoving it in other peoples faces.



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