Common Word, Common Lord

Common Word, Common Lord


Let’s Remember Each Other This Thanksgiving

In the Name of God, the Compassionate, the Merciful

Happy Thanksgiving to everyone! May everyone enjoy this day with their families. I am not going to go into the issue of whether Muslims should or should not celebrate Thanksgiving. For me, I have come to the conclusion that this cultural tradition does not contradict the principles of my faith.

Now, I may not sit and have a traditional American turkey dinner, but that is because I am first-generation American of Egyptian descent. Quite likely, I will have dinner with some Egyptian dishes (and probably turkey, also). Still, what is wrong with getting together on Thanksgiving? Nothing, as far as I am concerned.

Yet, let us all remember that, especially during these difficult times in our country’s history, there are a lot of people who are suffering. There are a lot of people who are out of work. There are a lot of people who will not get to enjoy a turkey dinner with “all the ‘fixins.” Yes, we should be thankful if we are not in their lot.

But, that cannot be the end of it. We have to try to help them. That is the essence of what it means to be truly thankful. Scripture says to us:

And [remember the time] when your Sustainer made [this promise] known: ‘If you are grateful [to Me], I shall most certainly give you more and more;but if you are ungrateful, verily, My chastisement will be severe indeed!” (14:7)

What better way to be grateful to the Lord than helping those who are less fortunate? Here in Chicago, a group of friends of mine – Muslims – have a turkey drive (http://www.sabeelpantry.org/turkeydrive.htm), during which they distribute 750 turkeys to needy families on the South Side of Chicago. I try to contribute something every single year. It is the very least I can do, in gratitude for the tremendous blessings I have been given.

I pray that everyone in our country, and in our world, can be thankful for something this Thanksgiving season. And I pray that each of us can try to help out those who need such help. That is the spirit of Thanksgiving. That is the true essence of what it means to be thankful.



Previous Posts

"Christmas in the Qur'an"
In the Name of God: The Infinitely Merciful and Compassionate Beloved Lord In my last post, we discussed how Jesus Christ is part of my life, even if I am not celebrating the religious festival marking his birth.  Yet, the verses in the Qur'an regarding the birth of Jesus Christ were only quickl

posted 4:48:43pm Dec. 21, 2014 | read full post »

Though Not Technically Celebrating Christmas, Jesus Is Still On My Mind As A Muslim
In the Name of God: the Infinitely Compassionate and Merciful Beloved Lord I must admit: at this time of year, sometimes it feels lonely. Practically the whole country is gearing up for the Christmas holiday, which is less than two weeks away. And while technically I do not celebrate the religiou

posted 3:08:26pm Dec. 14, 2014 | read full post »

"No Male Could Ever Be Like This Female"
In the Name of God: The Infinitely Merciful and Compassionate Beloved Lord Throughout my childhood, I have grown up listening to this story being recited out loud: When the wife of 'Imran said, "My Lord, indeed I have pledged to You what is in my womb, consecrated [for Your service], so accept t

posted 12:24:27am Dec. 05, 2014 | read full post »

Running For My Angel (And Chocolate) And Being Grateful The Whole...Painful...Way
In the Name of God: The Infinitely Merciful and Compassionate Beloved Lord On November 9, I was blessed to run in the annual Hot Chocolate 5K run in Chicago. It is a fun, relaxed race that takes you through the heart of Downtown Chicago, and my wife, daughter, and I ran the race in honor of our A

posted 2:53:04pm Nov. 23, 2014 | read full post »

Fellow Muslims: Please Say Funeral Prayers For Abdul-Rahman Peter Kassig
In the Name of God: The Infinitely Merciful and Compassionate Beloved Lord The barbarians of KIL (aka ISIS) have done it again: the U.S. has confirmed the beheading of Abdul-Rahman Peter Kassig, an American who went to Syria to help the victims of the civil war and was then captured by KIL. Here

posted 4:26:35pm Nov. 17, 2014 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.