Commonsense Christianity

Commonsense Christianity

Einstein Said That! Or Was It Jesus?

posted by Carolyn Henderson

We read to our kids. A lot. And all sorts of books. People who read a lot tend to think a lot. Seaside Story, original painting by Steve Henderson, sold. Licensed open edition print at Great Big Canvas.

You know, for a dead guy, Albert Einstein posts a lot of quotes on Facebook.

The latest on my wall is,

“If you want your children to be intelligent, read them fairy tales. If you want them to be more intelligent, read them more fairy tales.”

While this may be the explanation for my progeny’s  ability to think, ask questions, and not accept everything that they are told (sounds like a good definition of intelligence to me), I get tired of being told so many things by Einstein.

I mean, I know that he was smart and all, with the exception that he was unable to do anything, ever, with his hair, but so many quotes and witticisms are attributed to him that I’m asking myself, “Really? Einstein said that?” I’m waiting for his nuggets of wisdom on breastfeeding; I’m sure he knows more than I do.

The Norwegian’s Smart, Too

When I mentioned the Einstein quote to the Norwegian Artist on our walk this morning, he commented,

“Is there any particular reason that it means something when Einstein says it? We’ve been saying — and living — this for years.

“Does this mean, now that Einstein has said it, that we’re smart after all?”

It’s a good question, and one that Christians need to ask themselves:

Why do we believe what we do?

Years ago, when we attended a small church, we were the wild reprobates who read fairy tales to our kids and allowed them to trick or treat. This behavior, you see, was simply unacceptable, and later, when one of our children chose to explore a not particularly wise lifestyle, heads nodded sagely that this was the result of our parenting style. Some families thought it best to maintain a discrete distance to avoid “infection.”

We do it our way. Someone told me once that this isn’t a very “Christian” way of looking at things. Standing up for what’s right and walking alone when we have to — that sounds pretty Christian to me. Cadence, original oil painting by Steve Henderson; licensed open edition print at Great Big Canvas.

Acceptance, Finally!

Several months ago I ran into an inmate, er, attendee of this establishment when she mentioned that this young girl was pregnant, and that young man had an issue with drugs, and several families were trick or treating now, because this new, cool, hip family — they drank wine! — did it. The tone was all very understanding and accepting — for which I was glad, actually — but I couldn’t help thinking,

“It would have been nice to have received a bit of that acceptance when we needed it.”

What happened?

Well, Einstein said it, so suddenly, what was wrong was right.

We read fairy tales whether Einstein thinks it’s a great idea or not, and we trick or treated because we, independently of other people’s opinions, decided that this was good for our family. We base our decisions, not upon Einstein’s words or the actions of the new, cool, and hip family, but upon our own wisdom, discernment, and judgment, which we cultivate by reading the Bible for ourselves, meditating upon what it says, and depending upon Christ — not the pastor, not the elder board, not the leadership community, and not the new, cool, hip family — for elucidation.

Fooling the Elect — a Scary Thought

Do you know why so many people in the world consider Christians stupid? It’s not necessarily because we follow Jesus’ message, which would be an honorable reason for being called stupid — it’s because we obsequiously follow the voices and instructions of men: whether they are well known authors, seminar speakers who give explicit instructions on how to manage money or time, Christian “celebrities,” politicians who say the right words, and dissemblers of disinformation who purport to speak for the little people, on news stations and talk shows that assure the listeners how very, very unbiased they are.

We are told (by whom? have you ever asked yourself?) to be accountable to our leaders and obey those in authority, and we do. Unquestioningly.

Mark 13 is an interesting chapter, in which Jesus describes to the disciples the signs of the end of the age:

“Watch out that no one deceives you. Many will come in my name, claiming, ‘I am he,’ and will deceive many.” (Mark 13: 5-6)

and

“For false Christs and false prophets will appear and perform signs and miracles to deceive the elect — if that were possible.” (Mark 13: 22)

Is it possible to deceive the elect? Unfortunately, apparently so — if the elect are asleep, tranquilized, somnambulantly accepting what they are told because Einstein, or someone new, cool, and hip said it.

It’s fun to read Einstein quotes, but don’t run your life by them. Run your life by what Jesus said — and in order to do this, read, study, meditate upon, research, pray about, and discern what He says, without Einstein, or anyone else, looking over your shoulder and telling you how or what to think.

Thank You

Thank you for joining me at Commonsense Christianity. You know, I love fairy tales, and all sorts of well written fiction — because there’s a different, deeper truth to be found in fiction than in non-fiction, but you have to be willing to see it.

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“We Have Worms!”

posted by Carolyn Henderson

It’s easy to be like a fish, swimming along until our attention is caught by something dangling in front of our face. Black Walnut Fish, handcarved wood sculpture by Jordan Henderson, at Steve Henderson Fine Art.

I was on the last hour of a boring, four-hour drive when I passed one of those stores that sell everything: gas, Chinese food, Pepto Bismo, tax preparation services, and on the reader board they proudly announced:

“We have worms for fishing!”

Unusual for an establishment like this, they weren’t missing any letters, so it didn’t look like,

“W hav wrms 4 fing!”

or worse, just,

“We have worms!” although the top sentence, “We have worms” caught one’s eye before the bottom two words, “for fishing,” and given the reading speed of many people these days, it would be understandable if they chose to give the Chinese food a pass this time.

Information Underload

You need all five words to make sense of the sentence.

In other words, when you only have access to three of the words, but Someone else has all five, it’s a good idea to depend upon that Someone’s wisdom more than your own: walk by faith, not by sight.

You’re not God, and you don’t know, or control, everything. Now most people — outside of certain politicians, media moguls, global financiers, and movie stars — are vaguely aware of this, but this doesn’t stop us from taking the information that we do have — much of which is deliberately misleading  (especially if you rely upon corporate media news or government press releases), frequently wrong, and always incomplete — and using it to predict the immediate, and distant, future.

Our future is broader and bigger than we think, because the God we follow is not limited by anything, including a lack of information. The Pataha, original oil painting by Steve Henderson

The Future Looks Bleak

We hate our job, we’ve put out resumes, but all we can see is that, for the next 25 years, we’ll be slogging away in our despicable cubicle. Unless, of course, we get downsized, which we probably will.

So we’ll go bankrupt. And hungry. And be bereft of all goodness and joy until we die, slowly, in the streets on a cold January day. God doesn’t come into the picture because He’s obviously busy running other people’s lives — more productively, it looks like, than ours.

All we know is that We Have Worms, and it’s not good.

God, however, is never missing any letters for the reader board, and He is fully aware, although we are not, that these are earthworms, not parasites.

Temporary versus Eternal

“Though outwardly we are wasting away, yet inwardly we are being renewed day by day,” the Apostle Paul tells us in 2 Corinthians 4: 16 – 18. “For our light and momentary troubles are achieving for us an eternal glory that far outweighs them all. So we fix our eyes not on what is seen, but on what is unseen. For what is seen is temporary, but what is unseen is eternal.”

Like you, I caught that “light and momentary troubles” part and thought, “Are you KIDDING? What I’m going through is no JOKE!”

No, my friend, it isn’t. What you are going through is difficult and agonizing, but it is 1) not eternal and 2) not the whole picture. You are operating with only three words of a five-word sentence, and the missing two words change everything.

One of my favorite verses is Jeremiah 29: 11:

Hope, and a Future — non Political-Style

“‘For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the Lord, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.'”

It’s a beautiful promise, but it doesn’t end there:

“‘Then you will call upon me and come and pray to me, and I will listen to you. You will seek me and find me when you seek me with all your heart. I will be found by you.'”

Life is more than our struggles and problems, although some days it doesn’t feel that way, and though our focus is understandably the answer to our pressing dilemma, God doesn’t limit Himself, or us, to that perspective.

“. . . call upon me in the day of trouble,” he invites us in Psalm 50: 15, “I will deliver you, and you will honor me.”

We can honor Him because He is worthy of being honored: because He knows everything, possesses every letter for the reader board, and is the light we need to walk through the darkness. As smart as we are, we can’t operate efficiently on insufficient knowledge, but when we are a child of God, we don’t have to — we just need to follow, by faith, the Person who has all the answers.

Thank You

Thank you for joining me at Commonsense Christianity, where I encourage all of us who are believers and seekers to approach Christ directly and ask Him to teach us, gently and patiently, the way He taught His disciples.

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Why Are Christians So Weird?

posted by Carolyn Henderson

The Christian life is a dance, actually, requiring grace, practice, discipline, and sheer exuberant joy. Magenta, original oil painting by Steve Henderson.

On one of my blogs (not this one, so don’t freak out), I can see what phrases people type into the search engine to find me. One that frequently shows up is a variation of this:

“Why are Christians so weird?”

Before you preen, flattered that our godly and exemplary life is so blessedly different from the atrocious ways of the degenerates around us, don’t. Christians really do come across as weird, but not necessarily for the right reasons.

“Oh . . . praise our blessed JEEE-sus!” (This generally murmured, sotto voce but loud enough to hear, in soft, sibilant, reverent accents.)

Jesus? Jesus?

For some reason, we feel that if we speak this way, people’s heads will whip around, and they’ll say,

“Jesus? Jesus? Do you know Him? I’ve heard about Him, but I don’t know Him. Oh please, tell me about Jesus.”

More contemporary, focusing-on-their-image types phrase it this way,

“It’s a God-thing.”

“Oh, yeah,” those around them assent, pleased to be part of the Club of Cool. “It’s a God-thing, man.”

The idea is that we are so steeped in Christ, so spiritually saturated, that our very words drip with Jesus. The world — who hates Jesus — thereby hates us, because we exemplify His very being.

The closer we walk with Christ, the more beautiful, and gracious, our movements and dance. Dancer, original oil painting by Steve Henderson.

People Trip over Us

It’s a nice theory, but like many theories, it has holes in it. These holes cause the people around us to stumble, and when they stumble, we blame them, not us, because we know Jesus, and they don’t. Vitiated slobs.

While it is true that when we know, follow, love, worship, and submit ourselves to Christ, we will look weird to those who don’t because, well, Christ did, this weirdness comes from deep within. It’s difficult to see, identify, and point to because it’s intangible, evident only by the fruit it produces.

In Matthew 15: 11, Jesus says,

“What goes into a man’s mouth does not make him ‘unclean,’ but what comes out of his mouth, that is what makes him ‘unclean.'”

“Praise the Lord!” someone responds. “My words of blessedness gushing forth from the spring of my soul show how clean I am!”

Well, not exactly.

“The things that come out of the mouth come from the heart, and these make a man ‘unclean.’ For out of the heart come evil thoughts, murder, adultery, sexual immorality, theft, false testimony, slander.”

Conversely, the clean things look like kind thoughts, acceptance, generosity, compassion, gentleness, wisdom, and a deep, abiding sense of not caring about how cool we look.

Everyone Is Staring at Me

Two of my close friends are friends with a lovely woman who is fairly discomfiting to be around. One of her distinctive social attributes is that she talks loudly, a fact of which she is completely unaware (or able, actually, to control), and when my friends are with her, people stare.

Now nobody likes to be stared at, but my friends, who are Christians and weird, focus on their friend, who is Christian and weird, and they are careful to make sure that they do not exhibit any sense of embarrassment or shame around her because that would cut, deep. This woman is perspicacious enough to know that most people don’t want to be around her, because they think she’s strange.

Through the years, the trio have grown in their relationship, and the two accept that the one is who and what she is, in the same way that the one has always accepted the two for what and who they are, and if you’re going to be friends with the one, you’re going to be dealing with loud talking in the wrong places.

The other day, I was at the library (of course it would be the library) when I saw this woman across the room. I’ll be honest, my very first thought was to duck behind the books, but my second — because of the weird behavior of my two Christian friends — was to walk up to her and say hello.

“WELL HELLO!” she responded, her face wreathed in smiles. “HOW ARE YOU?”

“I’m growing up, thank you. And I’m getting better at this ‘weird’ thing.”

Thank You

Thank you for joining me at Commonsense Christianity, where I try to differentiate being weird because I’m taking Christ’s words seriously, and being weird because I’m trying to look my interpretation of spiritual. I mess up a lot.

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Child of God: You Are Much Beloved

posted by Carolyn Henderson

In our supercilious, adult way of thinking, we often consider the world, and lives, of children to be unimportant and insignificant. This is not wise. Summer Breeze, original oil painting by Steve Henderson.

My niece has a friend whose son has tumors. At a recent visit to the children’s hospital, they passed by a little girl — 3 years old — surrounded by her stuffed animals.

As my niece wrote on Facebook:

“She was joyfully telling them all how much she would miss them, (saying) goodbye and how much she loved them one by one.”

I stand in awe, bereft of speech, at the sweet innocence and trust of this child. She possesses a wisdom that is far beyond  that of many many adults — and it is not that we don’t have the capacity to see, like this little girl does. It’s that, through the years, we have buried the child within us — who represents the core essence of our being — in the words of the world.

The Value of Children

Jesus recognized the value and worth of children. His disciples were more like the rest of us, discounting their importance in the real world, shunting them to the side because they’re noisy and irrelevant. Matthew 10: 13 – 16 tells how people were bringing children to Jesus to be blessed, and the disciples were intervening, sending the children away:

“(Jesus) was indignant. He said to them, ‘Let the little children come to me, and do not hinder them, for the kingdom of God belongs to such as these. 

“‘I tell you the truth, anyone who will not receive the kingdom of God like a little child will never enter it.’ And he took the children in his arms, put his hands on them and blessed them.”

Children are defenseless, vulnerable, and necessarily trusting. As adults, let us remember what it feels like to be a child, and come before Christ with the freedom to be weak. Lilac Festival, original oil painting by Steve Henderson.

Four Spiritual Laws, or One Savior?

Ask the average American Christian how to get to heaven, and he will mention the Four Spiritual Laws, a series of Bible verses pulled from throughout the New Testament, explaining how all humans are sinners and separated from God; Jesus took the punishment for us; we need to repent of our sins and ask Jesus to save us; and Bingo, we’re saved.

Many Christians repeat the process multiple times throughout their life, generally during church alter calls, because they’re not sure they got it right the first, second, third, or twenty-second time (mea culpa — but no more — true Christianity frees a person from slavery and superstition), and I always wondered,

“If this is the ‘proper’ and ‘official’ way to become a Christian, then why didn’t Jesus lay it out Himself in a series of statements? Why do the verses have to be pulled from throughout the Scriptures?'”

What Jesus Says

Jesus did lay it out, several times, but in His Jesus-y, think-about-this way, and the verse in Matthew is one of them:

“Anyone who will not receive the kingdom of God like a little child will never enter it.”

Please don’t panic: this verse is meant to be an encouragement, not another obligation, and if you don’t know how to do it, think of the little girl at the head of this article:

She actually believes in heaven. She believes it’s a good place to go. And she’s one of those children that Jesus takes into His arms and holds.

So are you, my friend. At one time, you were a child, and you were vulnerable and defenseless, dependent upon the goodness and wisdom of the adults responsible for your care. Now in our society today, we like to vilify the family unit, calling pretty much everything dysfunctional and holding out our substitutes — government programs and social welfare interference — as the preferred solution, so it’s becoming increasingly difficult to understand what Good looks like, but what it means is this:

The Child in You Is Still There

When you were three years old, you couldn’t take care of yourself, and you needed someone bigger and stronger and wiser than you to ensure that you were fed, clothed, and warm. There was someone, somewhere, you intrinsically trusted to do this for you, and your life was in their hands. (I sincerely hope that those hands were good.)

As a Christian, you are a child of God, and although you are an adult now and know all about paying bills and meeting the property tax obligation and putting groceries on the table, you still need Someone bigger and stronger and wiser than you to ensure that you are fed, clothed, and warm. You gave your life to Him, and He holds it, and you, in His arms — and you can trust that He cares for you, and He cares about you.

His hands ARE good. If you don’t believe me, listen to the little girl.

Thank You

Thank you for joining me at Commonsense Christianity, where I encourage all of us to look for, long for, seek for Christ’s deep abiding love which He showed to those children, so many years ago. Children are a gift that God has given to a hurting world, to teach and remind us what trust, hope, faith, and joy look like.

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