City of Brass

City of Brass


Obama McCain Debate II: the best question

posted by Aziz Poonawalla

I confess that I wasn’t really watching the debate because I had any interest in what McCain would say. I already know who I am voting for and I already know where McCain stands on all the issues, except for his astonishing mortgage bailout plan, about which the less said, the better. I really wanted to get a better sense for the general governing philosophy for an Obama administration. On that score, the bulk of the debate was a rehash of Obama’s technocratic campaign, but this exchange (from the transcript) really stood out in my mind and was the highlight of the debate.

Brokaw: Sen. McCain, for you, we have our first question from the Internet
tonight. A child of the Depression, 78-year-old Fiorra from Chicago.

Since World War II, we have never been asked to sacrifice anything to
help our country, except the blood of our heroic men and women. As
president, what sacrifices — sacrifices will you ask every American to
make to help restore the American dream and to get out of the economic
morass that we’re now in?

McCain: [spending cuts, entitlements, earmarks, blah blah blah. Defense? ooookay.]

Obama: You know, a lot of you remember the tragedy of 9/11
and where you were on that day and, you know, how all of the country
was ready to come together and make enormous changes to make us not
only safer, but to make us a better country and a more unified country.

And President Bush did some smart things at the outset, but one of the
opportunities that was missed was, when he spoke to the American
people, he said, “Go out and shop.”

That wasn’t the kind of call to service that I think the American people were looking for.

And so it’s important to understand that the — I think the American
people are hungry for the kind of leadership that is going to tackle
these problems not just in government, but outside of government.

And let’s take the example of energy, which we already spoke about.
There is going to be the need for each and every one of us to start
thinking about how we use energy.

I believe in the need for
increased oil production. We’re going to have to explore new ways to
get more oil, and that includes offshore drilling. It includes telling
the oil companies, that currently have 68 million acres that they’re
not using, that either you use them or you lose them.

We’re going to have to develop clean coal technology and safe ways to store nuclear energy.

But each and every one of us can start thinking about how can we save
energy in our homes, in our buildings. And one of the things I want to
do is make sure that we’re providing incentives so that you can buy a
fuel efficient car that’s made right here in the United States of
America, not in Japan or South Korea, making sure that you are able to
weatherize your home or make your business more fuel efficient.

And that’s going to require effort from each and every one of us.

And the last point I just want to make. I think the young people of
America are especially interested in how they can serve, and that’s one
of the reasons why I’m interested in doubling the Peace Corps, making
sure that we are creating a volunteer corps all across this country
that can be involved in their community, involved in military service,
so that military families and our troops are not the only ones bearing
the burden of renewing America.

That’s something that all of us have to be involved with and that requires some leadership from Washington.

I can’t overstate the importance of this. Most serious analysts have long observed that energy lies at the crossroads of most of our 21st-century challenges: national security, environment, economy, and arguably liberty itself, since the track record of oil-producing nations in that regards has not exactly been great (OPEC stands as an exception to Fareed Zakaria’s general observation that political liberalism increases with per-capita GDP in his excellent book, The Future of Freedom). So not only did Obama answer the question, but he answered it in the right context – Americans should be asked for sacrifice, but not for something of minor importance. This is the essence of leadership – to draw people forward and lead them in positive action, not just treat the American public as passive entities along for the ride.

Interestingly, Obama’s answer is fundamentally conservative. First, it is literally conservative by definition – since we are being asked to conserve energy for our own collective sake. Politically, Obama’s answer is conservative because it places the responsibility for action directly upon the individual – McCain mentioned numerous times how great and resourceful we are as a people, but Obama here is actually paying more than lip service to that idea. Fundamentally, the concept of national service is also conservative – a protection and contribution to the home and hearth, an “energy militia” of citizenry in a sense. This is critical in fostering that sense of ownership that a citizen should feel at a gut level towards not the “government” but the society and nation.

Related – Daniel Larison’s extensive discussion on “patriotism” vs “nationalism“. It’s not an arbitrary distinction.



  • Jeff

    You know, a lot of you remember the tragedy of 9/11…
    A lot of you? How about all of us.

  • pacific_waters

    Another “great leader”.

  • PJS

    So true and insightful…we do need a visionary leader, one who will, during this difficult time help us to create and hold a vision, and in doing so, turn this economic situation into an opportunity for service in the spirit of giving not only getting. We all can come together and DO come together in times of need–it is our nature as human beings and American citizens. Lead us he will, thank you Barack Obama for wanting to lead us at this trying time of our nations history.

  • Rachael

    First and foremost as I read below the paragraph I noticed the comment box and the first one seemed a bit harsh. Each and every one of us will never forget 9/11 it was a tragic loss for many family’s. It doesn’t mater who you are or where your from. Pain was felt deep within our hearts. As for Obama he is very powerful in conducting his speech he stay’s focused on the need of all the people who need him durning this difficult economic situation. We need a man like Obama someone who will be there to help us all.

  • Alicia

    I thought Obama gave a great answer to that question.

  • Matt J.

    I could not believe Obama wants increased oil production! That is exactly what we do NOT need. We need to break our oil-dependence, not strenghten it. Yes, I know we are far too dependent on foreign sources for our oil, but the bad medicine of increased production will NOT help that. Diversified energy sources, especially lower carbon sources, is what we need. We need it too badly to risk diverting our resources on increased oil production.
    Since Oct 8th, we have already seen the price of oil drop w/o a significant increase in production. So no, we do not need increased production to bring the price down either.

Previous Posts

Video: (muslim) Mehdi Hasan interviews (atheist) Richard Dawkins at the Oxford Union
This is an excellent debate between the most emphatic atheist of our time, Richard Dawkins, and political journalist Mehdi Hasan. Hasan is brilliantly prepared for the debate and treats Dawkins with utmost respect, but methodically defends belief and religion as a force for good. https://www.you

posted 11:46:28am Apr. 08, 2014 | read full post »

Two Bohras come to aid of Frenchwoman attacked in Mumbai
In the past two months I've traveled to India three times, to attend the funeral and other events after the passing of Syedna Mohammed Burhanuddin (ra). This quite shocking story happened in the Fort area of Mumbai, which is quite close to where I spent much of my time and is considered one of the b

posted 6:20:59pm Mar. 18, 2014 | read full post »

Amidst the grief, solace in the succession of Syedna Mufaddal Saifuddin
This is a guest post by Durriya Badani The forty day period of mourning has now elapsed, but the profound sadness at the loss of the beloved head of the Dawoodi Bohra community, a spiritual mo

posted 9:48:33am Mar. 16, 2014 | read full post »

NYPD's illegal spying on Muslims was legal, says legal system
This is profoundly disappointing but not entirely unexpected: In a decision filed Thursday in federal court in Newark, U.S. District Judge William Martini dismisse

posted 12:44:10pm Feb. 21, 2014 | read full post »

Valentine's Day and Islam - the virtues of mohabbat (love)
Happy Valentine's Day! I am biased towards appreciating Valentine's Day not just for it's Gujarati origins but also because it's my birthday. However, not all Muslims share my appreciation. Here's a typical example: In its official Friday sermon text distributed to mosques in the Muslim-major

posted 6:04:27am Feb. 14, 2014 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.