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City of Brass

City of Brass

Ramadan for all

Ramadan mubarak to everyone! (and I do mean, everyone)

A roundup of Ramadan reactions from around the Islamsphere (aka the Brass Crescent):

Mr. Moo observes that preparing for Ramadan usually involves DATCWDWTDWWAFSWDRAS (no, I’m not spoiling that one for you. Go look :)

Captain Chaos chimes in with a few additional ways of getting Ready for Ramadan. (via Muse at Talk Islam)

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At altmuslim.com. Ibrahim Abusharif observes that Ramadan is a season to step outside our cartoon selves.

‘Aqoul hosts a Ramadan Open Thread in their usual witty, cynical fashion.

The London Islamic Network for the Environment invites you to Fast for the Planet. (via Thabet at Talk Islam).

via John of Crossroads Arabia blog, this Washington Post piece on the blend of science and tradition in the moonsighting methodology in Cairo.

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And finally, my Ramadan-blogging from last year at old City of Brass might be of some interest.

UPDATE: Don’t miss these hilarious e-cards: “may your Ramadan be devoid of blatant racial profiling”. Also, right here at Beliefnet, we have Ten Tips for Fasting Healthfully and Spiritually, and Eight Ramadan Lessons for All Spiritual Seekers.

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Brian

posted September 3, 2008 at 2:29 pm


I am not Islamic but I want to observe Ramadan as a way to understand Islamic Faith. I read once that the large difference between Christianity and Islam is that Islam focuses more on practice and Christianity more on dogma (theory). I have read the Koran and had many problems finding its applicability to my life…it just seemed so tied to the Age in which it was composed. Nevertheless a billion people can’t be all wrong so I want to do this to see if it will increase my understanding and perhaps open a new channel for me to God.
Is there a site like “Ramadan for Idiots” …something basic…that I can go to …I have started fasting as I know that much.
Thanks



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Aziz

posted September 3, 2008 at 4:29 pm


I think it’s more accurate to describe fasting in Ramadan as a way to understand your own self better, rather than to increase knowledge of the faith. Fasting is necessarily an inward-looking act. By doing it, we deny ourselves the demands of the physcal and strive to attain a more spiritual plane. I think that if you choose to fast, you will be embarking on a very rewarding journey. It takes discipline and courage to do it without religious obligation, in some ways your fast will be much harder than mine. I really respect that.
In terms of understanding Islam, I think that the best route is via the Qur’an itself, of which you can choose any translation that suits you, but if I were to recommend one I would suggest Michael Sells’ version, though it is not complete. I also recommend the sermons of Ali ibn Talib, the Nahjul Balagha.



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