Beliefnet
Chattering Mind

markgodtone.jpgMeet Meet Mark Patterson. He opens his mouth, and sounds come out.
Patterson knows his sounds soothe. Now he’s beginning to research how his sounds might heal.
Patterson has no training in music or Tibetan throat singing. The sounds, he says, just move through him. He writes: “I was given the ability to heal others through sound during a near-death experience in the February of 1986 when I was a teen.” He was subsequently influenced by a 1993 “Flower of Life” workshop he took with Drunvalo Melchizedek, and an event he attended featuring Barbara Marciniack. (Here are her books.) Then in 1995, Patterson received a phone call in the middle of the night from a stranger, a woman whose voice he didn’t recognize. She told him that his future would reside in sacred geometry and healing sound. That sealed the deal.
In the past seven years, guttural sounds similar to those of Tibetan monks, and other tones with powerful frequencies, have come through him, and he’s come to believe that his voice has the capability to “clear” a room of negative energy. His voice can also calm people down to such a degree that they fall into a sleep state.
When I first heard Patterson’s vocalizations on his website, I couldn’t believe he was naturally producing them. I contacted him, we exchanged emails. He’s in the process of researching the effects of his sounds on other peoples’ brain wave patterns.
Hear Patterson for yourself by clicking the audio buttons on these pages: Here’s what I think is his most soothing segment. His technicians must run the sound on a loop since you hear he’s taking no stops for breathing.
Scroll down to the bottom of this page to hear more (the chant also might spring on automatically). And here is Patterson amplified by the accoustics of an Egyption temple.
For the sake of comparison, here are the guttural mantra chants of Tibetan monks . Click around and tell me what effect these sounds have on you!

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