Beyond Blue

Beyond Blue


4 Ways to Clear the Mind Clutter

posted by Beyond Blue

Back when I didn’t have a stressful day job, I put this list together of ways to clear the mind clutter. Now it doesn’t really fly. But it might work for you! So here you go.

How can I keep the mind clutter as manageable as possible?

1. Unsubscribe, or just don’t check my mailbox.
Do I really need to read the 402 most e-mailed articles of the New York Times? The entire New England Journal of Medicine? The top health stories of CNN.com? NO. I don’t. I need to read the crime beat of the Annapolis Capital to make sure it’s safe to play at the neighborhood park. And I need to review a few health newsletters from Johns Hopkins and mental health blogs/sites for Beyond Blue. If I have time I’ll read everyone’s opinion on this year’s presidential candidates.

2. Stop checking my e-mail like it’s a slot machine.

I’m addicted. Boy do I know that now. But I can’t say good-bye forever to this way of communication or else I will lose all of my writing jobs. So I am going to limit my access to e-mail to only those hours in which I am working. If I’m not working, the computer is off, and in the bag. Maybe even in my bedroom closet, where I hid it for the 19 days I withdrew from the addiction.

3. Set boundaries.

In order to protect my personal time and time with my family, I plan on shutting down at 6 pm every night and putting the computer away. Ditto goes for the weekends. After all, weekends (and especially Sunday) were intended for rest. It says so in the Book of Genesis.

4. Quantify my time and energy.

I’ll often read an interesting story because I stumbled upon it while doing some research that is completely unrelated to the story. The unrelated piece leads me to another article, which is even more interesting, and before I know it, I have wasted a half-hour of working time, which will be docked from my sleep. However, if I consider my time and energy as a precious commodity, and quantify exactly how many minutes I have to work, then I can better resist the urge to read boring junk and really interesting junk that have nothing to do with the piece I need to finish.



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Elizabeth Lancia

posted October 10, 2012 at 9:23 am


Theses are very good ideas. I can use them, as I notice I’m checking my personal email several times a day. Thank you for not simply discarding them.
Elizabeth in Toronto, Canada



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eiyt

posted October 28, 2012 at 8:24 am


Hi, Dr.Zack Balo did some work for me about 3 weeks ago and I just wanted to let you all know that the results are really starting to happen! My ex and I ran into each other at Sears of all places! It was totally unexpected. He seemed a little nervous at first, but then we actually got to talking. Later that night he ended up apologizing to me for everything! And I mean EVERYTHING!:) I am so surprised yet I knew you would come through for me. We are now working things out and I am more than grateful to wiseindividualspell@gmail.com for everything that you’ve done for us. Thank You so much!



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