Beyond Blue

Beyond Blue


Video: My Exodus Story

posted by Beyond Blue

It’s helpful for me to remember concrete moments where I gave up all control, when I let myself be transformed under the “stars of hope. Here is one such moment, an “exodus moment,” when I crossed the Red Sea from slavery to freedom.

Click here to subscribe to Beyond Blue and click here to follow Therese on Twitter and click here to join Group Beyond Blue, a depression support group. Now stop clicking.



  • Barbara formerly Babs

    When you got out of the way, you allowed the authentic you to come forward. THAT is the person we love.

  • Larry Parker

    I think serious hospitalizations, if they lead to forward progress, are always Exodus moments for people with depression.
    In my case, unlike Therese’s hospitalization, it was negative rather than positive affirmation that drove me forward. Though I was separated from my wife, we had not begun divorce proceedings. Yet she refused to even visit me. I even pleaded for her to bring the dog we shared for me to see through the window.
    It was so pitiful. And her response was so pitiless. “You made your bed, you lie in it.”
    And I realized I was completely on my own in at least two ways — one, that this “thing” I’d had for 2-1/2 years was far worse than I thought and was never going away; and two, that I would be getting divorced soon and restarting my life that way as well.
    In the hospital library was a copy of John McCain’s “Faith of Our Fathers.” I read the story of how he summoned (and there were so many times where he thought he could summon no more) the will to survive seven years of torture from the Vietnamese. SEVEN YEARS.
    And I snapped out of my solipsism (even though I don’t agree with McCain’s politics, mind you) and realized others had been through worse. And if they could get through — even alone, as in McCain’s case, except for code scribbled between fellow prisoners — I could too.
    Even during the many moments afterward when I thought the end was nigh.

  • LadyBeams

    I am so sorry to approach you this way, but you used to have an email address to write to. I can’t tell you how much I get out of your writing. I have passed links to my daughter on many occassions, who also struggles with depression. Thank you so much.
    The reason I was trying to write to you was on a different “mental” issue. It is not a problem I have, but my boyfriend. There are many who suffer, and many more who want to know how to deal. I am worried about starting the blog because of the people that know him. I would never want to cause him any harm, and I’m not sure mutual people we know would ever read it, but what if? How does your husband feel about what you are doing? Do mutual friends of yours know about your blog? Do people make snide remarks to him? Are you using a “pen name” vs. real name to keep some kind of anomynity(I probably spelled that wrong).
    I understand you get so many emails a day and I hate to ad to your burden, but you’re the best I know, especially in this catagory, so I would appreciate your point of view.
    Thank you again for all your help with my daughter, and in advance with this.
    My email is ldbeams@yahoo.com
    Lauri Beamish
    San Jose, CA

  • Priscilla

    Thank you, Therese, for so eloquently describing to your readers how you access the powerful, authentic, compassionate, funny voice that so many of us love. By describing how you found your brave voice you have, as usual, exhibited enormous bravery. And grace. And generosity.

  • Larry Parker

    BTW, Therese, IMO (I omit the “H” intentionally), I don’t think one can be a writer and want to project one’s thoughts to the world without having SOME ego. Which I don’t think is a bad thing.
    If you say the negative, self-destructive part of your ego died that day, I’m with you 1,000%

  • Lance

    Thank you for your putting yourself out there, and I have no wish to denigrate who you are and have been thru, BUT
    For those of us without your beauty, talent, friendships, lovers, whom life has also given deep issues, it rings a little hollow only in this sense (again, I do not mean to minimize your life and struggles): that your positive story and that of others can give false hope sometimes to those of us more average, whom genetics, or fate, or environment has given a poor hand to play, and here I speak not only of myself, but others I have known and do know. Not that this news is all negative, because there is probably a way for anyone to find their way, but my oh my, it may entail some very harsh realities, in a sense that the universe does not love them and not all things are possible, even if highly desired and necessary to health and well being.

  • Mayanne

    J. K. Rowling was depressed because of her divorce. Divorce, according to many experts and thousands of studies, is likened to death in that the person moves through several stages until finally that person is healed. One such stage is depression. Some people weather the storm better than others but most people who divorce experience some of the stages.
    In my opinion, using her comments is just a way to draw in your readers. Rowling’s thoughts seem simplistic and obvious.

  • Cathy

    Excellent — wish I could pass this site along to many who cannot access a website because of poverty or other issues — you are inspiring –

  • Rose

    Therese,
    By putting your experience out for anyone to see and to listen to, I believe that you show how far you have come in your life experience. The message you got that day, that there is an unconditional love for each of us, from our God first and if we look, believe and accept it, from people around us. It is believing that we are worthy of this kind of love that is the hardest to believe. My life changed when someone told me to write down the name or names of people that made me feel bad about myself and write down the names of people who I would go to if I wanted to celebrate. They told me to get rid of the first list (one was my then husband and one was one of my sisters) and when I did get rid of the negative surrounding my life that I would be able to grow. I am divorced and limit my time and what I share with my sister and surrround myself with positive people and I cannot tell you how blessed my life is now, no matter if I am in poverty or grief, I have love from my true family and friends and that gets me through.

  • Jill

    Thank you for these video blogs, I love them! Please keep them coming :)

  • skylark

    Thank you Therese, for this powerful, moving testimony to the strength of the human spirit and the healing power of love….this step you took was brave but such a catharsis ….that is what gives your gift of writing new depths and authenticity. I thank God that
    you are ” one of us”…only “one of us” could communicate with such
    empathy and have a healing effect so evidenced in these comments. You have truly crossed the Jordan to a better land.

  • Julia

    Thank you, Therese. This is absolutely beautiful and such an inspiration. You must know that your willingness to write about your struggles gives others courage to do the same. At least, it has certainly done the same for me. So, thank you, again.

  • http://www.charismatacoaching.com Anne Costa

    There are so many ways that our stories are similar. It was in the psych ward where I fell into a million shattered pieces, only to be made whole for the first time in my life. On the day I arrived home from the hospital, an editor called and informed me that they were sending out a contract for my first book and it was through my recovery that I wrote that book… no ego, just starting from scratch in finding my self. It’s a beautiful thing when we accept our brokenness. In doing it, we are giving ourselves, our very souls permission to be born into a new life of love.
    I love your beyond blue blog. It is the single most honest and helpful resource I have ever encountered for depression. Every day there is something very genuinely helpful. Thank you

  • LJW

    Dear Therese, I found you through the Guideposts story, have bought both of your books, and look forward to your blog like a call from a friend. Your videos make me feel like I know you like a friend and for the first time have personal ( not just the professionals’) support for being bipolar. I can’t thank you enough for sharing of yourself and your research and your experiences to give all of us readers your gift.

Previous Posts

Seven Ways to Get Over an Infatuation
“Bewitched, bothered, and bewildered am I” wrote US songwriter Lorenz Hart about the feeling of infatuation. It’s blissful and euphoric, as we all know. But it’s also addicting, messy and blinding. Without careful monitoring, its wild wind can rage through your life leaving you much like the

posted 12:46:43pm Feb. 19, 2014 | read full post »

When Faith Turns Neurotic
When does reciting scripture become a symptom of neurosis? Or praying the rosary an unhealthy compulsion? Not until I had the Book of Psalms practically memorized as a young girl did I learn that words and acts of faith can morph into desperate measures to control a mood disorder, that faithfulness

posted 10:37:13am Jan. 14, 2014 | read full post »

How to Handle Negative People
One of my mom’s best pieces of advice: “Hang with the winners.” This holds true in support groups (stick with the people who have the most sobriety), in college (find the peeps with good study habits), and in your workplace (stay away from the drama queen at the water cooler). Why? Because we

posted 10:32:10am Jan. 14, 2014 | read full post »

8 Coping Strategies for the Holidays
For people prone to depression and anxiety – i.e. human beings – the holidays invite countless possibility to get sucked into negative and catastrophic thinking. You take the basic stressed-out individual and you increase her to-do list by a third, stuff her full of refined sugar and processed f

posted 9:30:12am Nov. 21, 2013 | read full post »

Can I Say I’m a Son or Daughter of Christ and Suffer From Depression?
In 1 Thessalonians 5:16-18, we read: “Rejoice always, pray without ceasing, give thanks in all circumstances; for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus for you.” What if we aren’t glad, we aren’t capable of rejoicing, and even prayer is difficult? What if, instead, everything looks dark,

posted 10:56:04am Oct. 29, 2013 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.