Beyond Blue

Beyond Blue


The 10 Best Bipolar Blogs, 2009

posted by Beyond Blue

top 10 bipolar blogs.jpg
I love it when Psych Central’s Sandy Kiume compiles her list of favorite blogs, because it saves me the work, and I’ve come to trust and rely on her opinions. So, for the 2009, here are the top ten bipolar blogs!

1. The Secret Life of a Manic Depressive

Do’s and Don’ts for the Mentally Interesting was a BBC Radio play based on Seaneen’s blog produced last May and just nominated for a Mind Mental Health Media Award. Always a compelling and honest read, it was no fluke or sympathy vote that caused us to place this blog near the top of our list last year – it deserves many accolades. Well done.

2. The Trouble With Spikol

Another great year for Liz Spikol, a stellar writer and enduring fave. Highlights from 2009: Liveblogging Primetime Outsiders, Maia Campbell’s story, Dr. Fred Goodwin, celeb depression confessions, and the streaming kitten cam. A mashup of adorable with hard-hitting, the puppies make the grim stories a bit easier to take in. Check out her cool video series, too.

3. Coming Out Crazy

Sandy Naiman is fierce and fabulous. With a background in print journalism, her blog was new to the net last year and it’s been fun to see her adapt to the medium – and vice-versa. Some of the perennial trolls have been buzzing around her blog, smelling fresh blood, but she deftly slaps them down with precise words soaked in reality and wisdom. Sandy is a dynamo who is an offline mental health advocate and speaker. In Coming Out Crazy, she’s making gorgeous jewelry from her goldmine of experience as a person living with bipolar.

4. Pax Nortana

Joel Sax has built a small new media empire for himself with a blog, Twitter feeds, vlogs and social networking profiles. Outspoken and productive, he’s a great activist (livetweeting the 2009 DBSA conference) and a chatty blogger who writes about more than the labels he’s been given. Joel also manages @Bipolar_Blogs, which aggregates fresh links to posts from many blogs by people who have been diagnosed with a bipolar disorder (add your blog here).

5. All About Bipolar

Amy (@torturedsoul) is a woman from Tennessee who writes thoughtfully about all aspects of experiencing bipolar disorder, but I especially like that she writes humor. Bonus points for a not-too-cluttered layout with useful links and widgets.

6. In a tie: Furious Seasons and Knowledge is Necessity.

Apples and oranges, Phil Dawdy and John McManamy have been among the best on the web for years, but 2009 saw them devolve into public feuding so they’re both bumped down the list together. Hopefully next year will bring a renewed focus on what they each do very well, and a truce.

7. Raw Writing for the Real World of Bipolar

Intimate, absorbing and moving, this is a diary-style blog by Cristina Fender that has mushroomed since she began. She’s now welcoming guest posts and building community, and has self-published a book as well. Energetic.

8. Caught in my Bipolar Burble.

She’s been blogging since 2003 and is consistently brilliant. Intimate and raw, very descriptive and at times hard to read. She’s been through a lot and her treatment-resistant disorder is still not responding to treatments, including a recent failed attempt at ECT (which led to the spin-off blog ECT: Electro-Convulsive Terror). Harrowing.

9. Time for your Meds

Crazy Tracy is triumphantly healthy, blogging once again and newly returned to work as a nurse. Her recovery is as dramatic as her dark moments have been. It’s great to see her back, a hopeful example to others who suffer severe bipolar episodes.

10. Crazy Black Woman

“My oddball behavior has been a badge of honor for me to wear,” says Dr. Gina, and I honor her for that behavior too. Her blog has aggressive, hypomanic uproar posts that are fun to read, with extra energy devoted to The Ariafya Universe, a mental health and wellness forum for diverse women. Phew! It’s impressive. Lots to read.

Honorable mentions: Victoria Maxwell’s Crazy for Life, Wellness Writer, Gus Greeper, Bipolar Happens, If You’re Going Through Hell, Keep Going, Bipolar: Crazy Mermaid’s Blog, and Patient Anonymous. Cheers to all!

Enjoy the blogs above, and please leave more links with your comments.

Click here to subscribe to Beyond Blue and click here to follow Therese on Twitter and click here to join Group Beyond Blue, a depression support group. Now stop clicking.



Advertisement
Comments read comments(6)
post a comment
JB

posted November 8, 2009 at 7:20 pm


I was in two hospitals for an alleged bipolar disorder. I was given lithium carbonate and a drug called consta. The first hospital was one month, and the second was six months, 7 months total. After being in the second hospital for 3 months, I noticed that when I woke up in the morning, I’d urinate on my leg uncontrollably. I told my doctor and he said it was a prostrate problem. I also noticed that my foot shook uncontrollably sometimes. I also noticed that my cognitive abilites were severely impaired, I couldn’t read more than one page of a newspaper. The drugs were making me a retard too. When I got out of the second hospital in April of ‘09, I went to the internet to look up the side effects of lithium. The internet said lithium interferes with ability of the thyroid to produces thyxroxin, lithium damges the kidneys, and causes tremors and causes chronic fatigue. When I got out of the hospitial, I stopped taking all drugs, because I had all of these symptoms. The only symptoms that went away after discontinuing the drugs were the uncontrollable urination (which was indication of kidney damage) and the foot tremors. I still had severe impaired cognitive abilities, I couldnt’ remember what I read and I was forgetful. I also had severe chronic fatigue which didn’t go away, and I also had sleeping problems, waking up at 2:30 or 3:00 am in the morning. After sleeping 12 to 15 hours, I still felt exhausted. In September, I noticed that I started to get sick with a cold EVERY DAY, which indicated that the drugs gave me an IMPAIRED IMMUNE system. And the sleeping problem got worse, I started to wake up 3 times during the night instead of one time during the night. I said to myself. Since Medical Doctors can’t fix chronic conditions, I went to a Chinese acupuncturist. His treatment helped me with the chronic fatigue and he strengthened my immune system, and my cognitive abilites started to come back, but I was still forgetful. I noticed that before acupuncture, my body temperature was 97.5 and after acupuncture, it went to 98.1 degrees. The acupuncture helped with the sleeping problem (stopped waking up 3 times per night) but didn’t cure it, because I still woke up one time per night. About one week ago I started taking an oral EDTA product to reduce my blood pressure and this product cured my sleeping problem. And I noticed I had more energy and I didn’t wake up during the night, I slept the whole night through. As a chemist, I can only conclude that Lithium interfered with the coenzymes in the mitochondria of the cell, which produces ATP which is an molecule that gives the body heat and energy. By the lithium in my tissues interfering with the function of billions of mitochondria, my body was not producing enough ATP, which led to chronic fatigue, low body temperature, and a sleeping problem. According to the internet, LITHIUM HAS ABSOLUTELY NO NUTRITIONAL VALUE IN THE HUMAN BODY. In my opinion, lithium is a poison like lead and mercury. To talk lithium is nuts. I think Psychiatrists are quacks. If you want to have chronic fatigue and act like a retard, then continue to take your lithium. If you want to have low body temperature and hypothroidism, then take your blasted lithium. I prefer to work for a living rather than being disabled. I can only conclude that the EDTA is taking all of the lithium out of my body, that’s why I’m recovering right now. In six months, I’ll have normal blood pressure, and I won’t need to take the bullshit blood pressure medicine like the rest of the population.



report abuse
 

Angela T

posted December 8, 2009 at 7:33 pm


Keep taking your medication.



report abuse
 

Valerie Furnas

posted June 19, 2010 at 9:00 am


Thank you for getting these links out for everyone. I am in a bipolar family. Out of the 6 cousins on my Mom’s side 4 are bipolar. Each one is hit differently and has a different path to recovery. Each fought medication and none are completely stable. Our story is here. wwww.life4mebyme.blogspot.com



report abuse
 

Morten

posted February 22, 2011 at 12:22 pm


Buying a Wake Up Light helped me increase both my quality of sleep and i have not overslept for work once after i got it;)recommended



report abuse
 

lusGuirediems

posted March 1, 2011 at 3:43 pm


Hello. And Bye.



report abuse
 

iambipolar2

posted June 27, 2011 at 6:35 pm


Thanks for the suggestions.



report abuse
 

Post a Comment

By submitting these comments, I agree to the beliefnet.com terms of service, rules of conduct and privacy policy (the "agreements"). I understand and agree that any content I post is licensed to beliefnet.com and may be used by beliefnet.com in accordance with the agreements.



Previous Posts

Seven Ways to Get Over an Infatuation
“Bewitched, bothered, and bewildered am I” wrote US songwriter Lorenz Hart about the feeling of infatuation. It’s blissful and euphoric, as we all know. But it’s also addicting, messy and blinding. Without careful monitoring, its wild wind can rage through your life leaving you much like the

posted 12:46:43pm Feb. 19, 2014 | read full post »

When Faith Turns Neurotic
When does reciting scripture become a symptom of neurosis? Or praying the rosary an unhealthy compulsion? Not until I had the Book of Psalms practically memorized as a young girl did I learn that words and acts of faith can morph into desperate measures to control a mood disorder, that faithfulness

posted 10:37:13am Jan. 14, 2014 | read full post »

How to Handle Negative People
One of my mom’s best pieces of advice: “Hang with the winners.” This holds true in support groups (stick with the people who have the most sobriety), in college (find the peeps with good study habits), and in your workplace (stay away from the drama queen at the water cooler). Why? Because we

posted 10:32:10am Jan. 14, 2014 | read full post »

8 Coping Strategies for the Holidays
For people prone to depression and anxiety – i.e. human beings – the holidays invite countless possibility to get sucked into negative and catastrophic thinking. You take the basic stressed-out individual and you increase her to-do list by a third, stuff her full of refined sugar and processed f

posted 9:30:12am Nov. 21, 2013 | read full post »

Can I Say I’m a Son or Daughter of Christ and Suffer From Depression?
In 1 Thessalonians 5:16-18, we read: “Rejoice always, pray without ceasing, give thanks in all circumstances; for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus for you.” What if we aren’t glad, we aren’t capable of rejoicing, and even prayer is difficult? What if, instead, everything looks dark,

posted 10:56:04am Oct. 29, 2013 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.