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Glenn Close Tackles Mental Illness … Thank You!

posted by Beyond Blue
Glenn Close Mental Illness.jpg

“Mental illness is just part of the human condition,” Glenn Close said today on “Good Morning America.” Halleluia! A Hollywood response to all the scientology. Today Close spoke out for the first time on television about the legacy of mental illness in her own family: Her sister, Jessie, suffers from bipolar disorder, and Jessie’s son has schizo-affective disorder.

 

Glenn has launched a nonprofit organization called BringChange2Mind, which she hopes will raise awareness about mental illness, strip mood disorders like bipolar disorder and schizophrenia from their unfair stigma, and lend support and information to the mentally ill and their families.

Katie Escherich of ABC News writes:

Jessie, the youngest of the four Close siblings, was diagnosed with bipolar disorder nine years ago at the age of 47, “after living with it probably her whole life,” said her sister. Bipolar disorder affects some 5.7 million American adults, according to the National Institute of Mental Health.

The actress said her sister was always a “wild child,” and Jessie now says she knew for most of her life that something was wrong. Both sisters said a lack of understanding of mental illness when they were growing up played a part in Jessie’s delayed diagnosis.

“You don’t talk about depression or alcoholism or mental illness. …I think that’s probably true in a lot of families,” her sister said. “We didn’t have the vocabulary, we didn’t have the knowledge.”

With medication, Jessie Close’s symptoms have been brought under control, and family members realize how fortunate it is that they can afford good care. She has experienced side effects, including fatigue and weight gain, and finding a balance between staying stable and staying creative took time. Jessie, a writer, said, “It’s worth it.”

“We’re getting more and more sophisticated medication,” Glenn Close said. “We need to keep people with mental illness living full and productive and creative lives.”

Go check out BringChange2Mind.org!

And a humongous hug to Glenn Close!!!

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Frank

posted October 21, 2009 at 12:32 pm


I was so excited and pleased to see this. Therese, you know I lost my brother to the illness. And as I listened to Glenn and Jessie, I could hear my own words and feel my own sadness about not having known or understood what all was going on with my wild child brother…until it was too late. I’m teary eyed as I type this knowing that these kinds of efforts are not too late. There is hope. And hope is a wonderful thing to regain after believing it to be lost forever.
Frank,



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dr aletta

posted October 21, 2009 at 1:07 pm


Thanks for bringing our attention to Glenn Close’s work, Therese. I’m going to link these articles to my blog. My bipolar patients and their families will especially appreciate it.



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Thom Hunter

posted October 21, 2009 at 4:17 pm


It’s very positive to see Glen Close taking a position based on intimate knowledge and true interest. So many celebrities latch on to issues of significance but not truly personal. She could have a great impact. Not only is mental illness, as she says, a part of the human condition, but so are the various struggles some people have with everyday living and the temptations it affords us all. Her focus on helping everyone achieve what is possible without being alienated is encouraging.



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Ann

posted October 21, 2009 at 4:34 pm


I have suffered from Major depression for 30 years. It started as postpartum depression with my first child and became worse with every child I had. It is a horrible thing. Several members of my family have struggled with mental illness. My grandmother had what we believe was schizophrenia. My youngest brother suffered from depression and committed suicide at 27. My other brother has suffered with depression and both he and I have been suicidal. I would never wish this condition on anyone. However, I wish people who don’t believe it is a real illness could have a touch of it for just a day or so to see what it feels like. I have real issues with Tom Cruise and feel sorry for his wife and daughter. I hope they never experience depression or any form of mental illness because they would not be allowed to get the help they would need.



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Kira

posted October 21, 2009 at 5:43 pm


This is something people need to talk about so we can get rid of the stigma and misconceptions. Having a mental illness should be no more shameful than having a broken leg or hypothyroidism. Fixing the health care system is the next step…



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Monica

posted October 22, 2009 at 10:12 am


Thank-you Glenn Close for helping to bring this out in the open – I am from a family of mental illness and growing up it was all about denial. My brother suffered from schizophrenia and committed suicide at age 20 after being committed at age 16. Being raised by an Alcoholic father who suffered and never sought treatment. I am a success story at 46 – been on medications for 16 years that allow me to be successful in my life – my career -and help others who suffer.



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Monica

posted October 22, 2009 at 10:13 am


Thank-you Glenn Close for helping to bring this out in the open – I am from a family of mental illness and growing up it was all about denial. My brother suffered from schizophrenia and committed suicide at age 20 after being committed at age 16. Being raised by an Alcoholic father who suffered and never sought treatment. I am a success story at 46 – been on medications for 16 years that allow me to be successful in my life – my career -and help others who suffer.



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Nancy N.

posted October 22, 2009 at 10:13 am


Thank you Glenn Close for being so open and honest. I have personally never understood, that while every other part of the body has break- downs that the brain, which is the MOST complicated, is expected to work perfectly at all times. That when brain chemistry gets “out of sync” there is a stigma. There is no stigma for diabetes, heart disease, asthma etc. I don’t know of a family that has not been affected by depression. I am so grateful for medication and couseling that allows those with “brain chemistry issues” to live full and productive lives.



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Your Name

posted October 22, 2009 at 10:22 am


My father was bipolar. He’s deceased now but he made our lives hell. Two of my daughters are bipolar and one brother and one cousin are schitzophrenic. I am so pleased to see someone in the public eye be able to come out with her own story of her experience with a bipolar family member. It is a tough thing for the patient but it affects everybody they come in contact with and especially family and friends. They need all the understanding and support that we can give them to help themselves get the treatment they need. When my children showed signs, I got them the help they needed. They are both adults now but I see such a difference in them. They need love just like anybody else regardless of their mental health.



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Dolores

posted October 22, 2009 at 10:33 am


Depression is as painful as any other illness. Usually well-meaning relatives will tell us “just pull yourself together”. Of course, if we knew how to do that, we would have done it ourselves without their telling us. I found a wonderful self-health mental group called Recovery (www.recovery-inc.org) that helped me back in 1976. There are meetings in every state and in six foreign countries.



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Terri

posted October 22, 2009 at 10:38 am


Thank You to this family for being open and honest about what is such a taboo issue in todays society. My father suffered for years with depression and bipolar disorder that was not treated with medicine. He had grown up thinking it was shameful to have a sickness like that. I have children of my own now and want to be able to provide information for them should they or their children need it. I don’t want there to be any shame for something that.



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Orlando Ferrand

posted October 22, 2009 at 11:00 am


My support goes to you Glenn Close, and also my encouragement in your effort to raise awareness on such a tabu issue that so many are affected by. The story of your sister is also the painfully shared and most of the time, painfully silenced story of many of us. Coming from a family in which mental illness has not being a stranger, I believe in the need to be open about the condition so we can all, as a people, contribute to live full lives and be gentle with one another. Most of all, I believe that being honest about mental illness decreases its fatal outcomes when untreated, and makes us all endure without pain, the miracle of life so many times taken for granted.



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Sharon

posted October 22, 2009 at 11:15 am


My 27 year old daughter was diagnosed with bi-polar one year ago. I knew when she was two that something was wrong. I took her to the doctor and he said it was terrible twos. At 6 I took her in again. The doctor told me to throw water in her face. By the time she was 14 she was out of control and how no ideal why. She broke the law, cut school, ran away, kicked me, hit me and was abusive to her siblings. Instead of getting help, she got a criminal record. Now she has difficulty renting an apartment, finding a job and many other things necessary to live because she has a criminal record. Her father was bi-polar. He passed away at age 47. She had not seen him since she was 2 but when we learned of his death and his bi-polar we finally got a doctor to listen to us and finally diagnose her so she can get the medicine she needs. We are not financially set so she still has never gone for counseling or learned about how food and other things can trigger reactions of the bi-polar. She is really a very sweet person who would do anything for anyone but the bi-polar turns her into someone we don’t know when she is without medicine.



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Your Name

posted October 22, 2009 at 11:19 am


My sister had bypolar disease. She was diagnosed at age 19. Back then they called it manic depressive disorder. She stayed in manic mode most of the time. Through years of medication that made her ill, she passed away at the age of 37. Back then they tried electro-shock therapy, a padded cell, and medicine that made her vomit everyday. Eventuallyt he medication destroyed her kidneys. She had a transplant and died from it. This is a horrible disease. People need to understand that these folks cannot help themselves. My sister told me once that while in a manic mode…that she knew everything she said or did….just had no control over it. I pray for those with mental illness. I pray even more for the family and friends that must take care of these people. thanks Glen close for coming out and telling everyone about Jessie. So many are suffering with depression.



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Dana Thompson

posted October 22, 2009 at 11:21 am


I really appreciate Glenn Close stepping forward on behalf of mental illness, my sister is a schizophrenic and has suffered for many, many years, through the ups and downs of medications and hospitals, my parents have suffered adn our family has suffered, Jack Palance was on teh forefront of the schizophrenic issue (his sister suffered from this), he tried to make headway and did what he could, I think perhaps this is a time when we can really make some steps forward, and get rid of the stigma once and for all, thanks Glenn, God bless you and your sister and your whole family



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Your Name

posted October 22, 2009 at 11:46 am


Thanks for sharing this with the world.
So many can be helped by your testamony.
Please check out this site, it can help some mental illness.. and the chemical imbalance of the brain…
http://www.checkoutkangen.com please reveiw .. e-mail me
can give you more infor… try the water free…
maria carrasco
805-813-2642



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Maria Carrasco

posted October 22, 2009 at 11:50 am


THANK YOU.. GREAT VIDEO..
Maybe more people will reach out for help
this technology from apan has hepled millions with better health, and bring the body into balance.
http://www.checkoutkangen.com
all the best
Maria



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Your Name

posted October 22, 2009 at 11:54 am


Thank you Glenn Close, I was ready to back down from trying to help others, for providing myself and others with that extra boost that will help one our newest support groups for those of us whose lives are touched by mental illness on a daily basis. A group of us brave souls just completed a training course for Consumer Peer Support here in the heart of the Rockies which is well-known for it’s pristine beauty and healthy living, yet the mind has been neglected. Our support group starts next month in a little Mt. Ski town outside of Aspen called Glenwood Springs,Colorado. We have one brave young soul on our team who is going to reach out to the Aspen area as part of our team effort to reach as many counties in Colorado as is possible. I was scared and feeling vulnerable “coming out” to announce to the world that I live with depression and BiPolar. Our goal is to help others on their road to recovery to live a fullfilling purposeful life. And “Little Princess”-you know who you are, bravo for being part of our team! Together we can help remove the stigma of mental illness where we live. God Bless you Glenn Close for your courage and love, to stand by your sister.



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Randy

posted October 22, 2009 at 11:55 am


I have a brother with bipolar, an ex with depression and BPD, and a daughter with depression and BPD. I don’t know if my brother is taking meds anymore or not. My guess is not, as none of the other family members can tolerate his behavior as it is. My ex has been on a regime of medication, therapy, etc., etc., and it appears there is some hope with all of that. My daughter, has been doing very well with meds, and a fair amount of therapy to accompany that. There are times we need to call her on some things, but with her willingness to accept that she has this disorder, she is willing to accept that some of the things she does might not be appropriate. And yes, she too, when she was 2 years old or so, I believed there was something wrong with her too. At age 14 she was in inpatient treatment for about 3 years…… when I spoke with her therapist about that, she laughed out loud at me. So to all you therapists and Dr.’s who think you have all the answers…. please listen to the parents, and ask appropriate questions! As a person that has lived with 5 differnt people in my life who have suffered from similar illnesses, we do see things that therapists may not even know about.



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Gloria

posted October 22, 2009 at 1:01 pm


I applaud Glenn Close for stepping up to the plate! I am in the process, slowly, of writing apiece on alcoholism, and the stigma that remains with regard to this MEDICAL condition. Alcoholism, bipolar disorder, depression, you name it, are NOT character flaws. They are legitimate medical conditions, no less so than cancer or diabetes. Yet society in general, and even the majority of medical professionals still treat sufferers like ‘bad’ people. There is so little competent, sympathetic, even adequate, help for sufferers, it astounds me. I would like to recommend a book, ‘Agnes’ Jacket,’ to anyone with an interest in the subject of mental illness. I apologize to the writer for not being able to remember her name. But, it provides a powerful, caring insight into the subject, and a scathing commentary on the medical profession for it’s steadfast refusal to treat these illnesses with the same care that they give to their cancer or diabetes patients. Sufferers of mental illness are very often bright, ambitious people with much to contribute to society, given the appropriate care and treatment. Unfortunately, without that treatment, which is often pitifully hard to find, or unaffordable, unfortunate things can happen. Imagine a world in which an alcoholic or a bipolar could discuss his/her disease with the same expectation of comfort and caring that a cancer patient receives? It is still very much an uphill battle, though, and Ms. Close has her work cut out for her. Again, I applaud her for taking on this battle.



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Don M

posted October 22, 2009 at 1:10 pm


I wonder how all of these healthy people end up with some kind of mental defect, which usually becomes obvious when they reach their golden years?
Is it because of the meds that they are prescribed? Or is it because they got all of the shots that the government said they should get. I have read that flu shots can cause, add, adhd, dimentia, alzeimers, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and numerous forms of depression. Why would the FDA permit drugs that can cause these problems be dispensed?
Look at the heathly lifespan of some of the pacific islanders, who lack all of these heath problems. Look at the foods that they eat, and absence of food preservatives.
I wonder if people in developed contries are purposely being genetically damaged, by the people that run the labratories that create all of these medicines and food preservatives?
And if all of these issues are true. Why would the government do this to people?



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Your Name

posted October 22, 2009 at 1:31 pm


ALL of the members of a “family” should realize they are ALL contributing to the health (or illness) of each of their family members. We do not exist alone in the world. We are acted-upon and act-upon others with whom we interact to either have a healthy relationship or a sick one. Glenn Close seems to be a strong individual but sometimes strength can mask insecurity which can be a tool to destroy a family member. Sometimes it takes a non-family member to objectively analyze a family and each of its members to identify where the problems lie and then the family members can help each other to fight difficulties which we all face in the world.



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DARIA

posted October 22, 2009 at 2:51 pm


I am glad to see this subject being addressed as this stigma that society has about mental illness is from the dark ages. It is a real and painful thing to experience if you have a mental condition and there is nothing to feel ashamed about. It is just like having diabetes or a heart disease. It is a real illness, not a made up stigma. My husband has bipolar. Once you say that word, you can see the look on people’s faces on how they really feel and it is not the
right way to be looking at this topic. I am behind anything or anyone who can and will bring this to the forefront. This issue needs to be addressed as well.



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Your Name

posted October 22, 2009 at 3:57 pm


Unless you have dealt with a family member, or someone close to you that suffers from schizophrenia you don’t have a clue. The illness will tear a family apart especially when children are involved. I personally had to make some tough decisions for me and my children because their mother is paranoid schizophrenia. It is a very helpless situation to be in no one wins.



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cathy

posted October 22, 2009 at 5:49 pm


I come from a family of alcoholics, cocaine addicts and just flat out chaotic lifestyles. I favored natural healing at the young age of 15 after giving up on school so that I could work and have things that all of my schoolmates “seemed to have.” Through the years although I never grabbed a formal education, I gained a tremendous amount of knowledge. I began to experiment with the studies of Jethro Kloss naturalist, herbalist. Dr. of naturopathy. I found so much enlightenment with studying human illness and God’s cures and remedies. The biggest and most valuable to me is the fact that the human nervous system can heal with the correct treatment and balance. We’re all shook up. So we go ahead and poison ourselves some more with pharmacreticals that slow us down and level us. Do we know the damage that’s being done to our livers and other body organs?
Well, we all have a disorder or ten, and its all about slowing down, there’s nothing to chase. Anyone can be bi-polar. Its about anger no? Forgive yourself. Rename your frenzy. Accept YOU. We all make mistakes. Guess what? Study B-complex for mental illness people. You’ll all be more sane. Honest. Scizophrenic people all lack the B-complex. Paranoids also. Melissa tea is great for these crazy feelings. Check it out. God bless Glenn and Jessi!!!



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Your Name

posted October 22, 2009 at 6:48 pm


At age 60 after functioning fine as a flight attendant for a major airline for 38yrs. I was having difficulty getting out of bed and functioning so I could get to work on time. My daughter had graduated college and left to live in Fla. I missed her terribly. I became very depressed. My employer made me retire and was totally unsymphetic. They thought I was just late to work after 38yrs. My supervisor was the smart one; she knew that something was wrong. Unfortunately she was away on a maternity leave when two other women in the office decided that I should go.Fortunately, I had a good amount of pension & 401-k. I’ve restructured my life and now only work 3 days a wk in a local dept. store. I miss my friends that I worked with at the airline but, I don’t miss the tough grind of the airline. I was diagnosed as a Soft bi-polar II and still just want to sleep all the time. My mother is having terrible problems with staying mentally balanced. I believe that she must be bi-polar also. It is very tough as people just do not understand.



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Joni Berkebile

posted October 22, 2009 at 8:31 pm


I’m Glenn Close in my Family………just misunderstood….but i keep smiling:)



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SuzanneWA

posted October 22, 2009 at 9:29 pm


I had my first “nervous breakdown” in 1968, when it was erroneously diagnosed as “schizophrenia.” In 1970, I was admitted to the psychiatric ward of a major University Hospital, and was told it was “manic depression.” My last hospitalization, in 1977, the diagnosis was “bipolar disorder.”
I’m an adopted child, but found my biological mother in 2003. I found out that my maternal grandfather was a paranoid schizophrenic, which added to the genetic element. This year, my 83 yr old mother was diagnosed “BIPOLAR!” She’s doing exceptionally well on medications, and I’m VERY happy that her life has turned around.
I’ve been stabilized on my meds for 32 years, and am compliant with my treatment plan. There’s NO reason why a person with bipolar disorder CAN’T lead a reasonably “normal” life.



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Nicole

posted October 23, 2009 at 1:27 am


After being married for 13 years to a BiPolar 1, Manic Depressive, Paranoid Schizoprenic,w/ Post Tramatic Stress Disorder, I have become quite the expert on recognizing the disorder when talking w/ other people that have lived in the same kind of life I have and they are not even aware that they have been w/ a BiPolar person. Unfortunately my marriage is ending in a Domestic Violence Order against my husband, I endured alot of physical and mental abuse from the man I had loved so many years, because I knew he had a mental illness and we have 3 children together, I stayed w/ him until I come to realize I am an abused wife and my children were at risk if I stayed w/ him. Two of my children have BiPolar, because it is a heriditary illness just like so many other illnesses. My husband has been on Lithium for 9 years now but the thing w/ BiPolar is that when the person is on meds for any length of time they come to miss their highs or they feel like they are well enough to stop their meds which can be devistating to a family unit. I could write a book on this subject after living in what has basically been a prison for trying to keep him stable and on track, and trying to not rock the boat to have a semi- normal life if you can call it that.Some people w/ multiple diorders such as my husband when they reach a certain age, in his case 44-45, they tend to regress and often wish they had their old life style back, in this case it was the ultimate downfall to our marriage. I can only recomend that if you suspect that you or someone you love may have a mental disorder seek help immediately and find the right medication for you or them, sometimes it takes more than one try at meds, you HAVE to be on the right one. I have delayed putting my kids on medication for fear it would hender their thinking process because my husband has told me that his meds made him feel like his head was foggy all the time. Also you might notice alot of people w/ BiPolar are extremly intelligent, but they have mood swings that are uncontrolabe it is at this point they need help to control them, my son is 12 now and is going through puberty and has BiPolar so this makes even harder for him to control his anger outbursts, so it is time for me to step in and help him the same way I did his dad, as I was the one who figured out what his problems were and gave him the ultimatum of going on medication or lose your family and we remained together for another 9 years after he went on medication, but when your own health starts to decline you have to make that difficult decision it’s either me or him, you can’t always make things better and when I realized I could no longer help him anymore, I need to be there for my kids so I have to put my health first so I can be around to help my children through their long journey ahead of them and help them cope w/ what lyes ahead of them, it is a family thing that everyone has to accept and decide ok we have to do this for the sake of everyone although it can be the most difficult decision of your life.
I hope I have enlightened just one person and sorry for the lenghtly statements but there is no short answer to this wide spread illness.



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Ann

posted October 24, 2009 at 8:18 am


My family has also been affected by these neurological illnesses. In honor of my son’s birthday, I wrote about my experience with his illness. (see blog). I think one thing we need to do is use a different vocabulary – brain rather than mental. We also need a cure, not just medication. Or not stopping with medication. We would not expect a person with heart disease to carry a defibrulator around with them and call that a solution. Just because we get the heart working again, we don’t stop there. We go on to find the cause and the cure. While I understand that the medications have a place in treatment, they aren’t truly restoring people’s lives. We need a cure.



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Leeann

posted October 25, 2009 at 8:50 am


I agree with Ann totally, I have Bipolar/depression, PSTD and others, ever since I was a kid I knew something was wrong. At 18 I went to a dr. who put me on a med and I went of b/c of side effects. I have been married two times. I have put my family through hell with this illness, nervous breakdown in 04 hospitalized, respite x2. Finally after demanding the help I needed by a real dr. and not a Phs. assistant I finally after many new meds trying he found the right ones, I am doing ok but that is NOT THE SOLUTION THIS IS AN ILLNESS JUST LIKE ANY OTHER ONE AND IT NEEDS TO BE RECONNIZED AS THAT AND HELP FINDING CURES FOR THIS SHOULD BE PUT OUT THERE TO THE COMMMUNITY AS WELL AS THE MEDICAL FIELD AND THE SCHOOLS THAT DO THE RESEARCH!!!!!! ALso get rid of the stigma as Glenn Close said… We are people with an illness just as a cancer patient, heart, and all other illness. Enough is enough!!! Public AWARENESS IS THE KEY. Please if there is anything I can do to help my personal email is leeanndanzig@yahoo.com, I belong to a lot of causes and have yet to find one about mental illness..I am also part of Facebook as LeeannForrestDavisDanzig.
Thank You Therese for the article I did not even know about Glenn Close and her family. My prayers are with her and always with you and your family as well as for others out there suffering with Mental illness God Bless all of you.



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Karla

posted October 28, 2009 at 2:59 pm


I am so happy to finally see a star talking about mental illness. After suffering for years I was finally diagnosed 2 years ago with Bipolar disorder and put on medication. Since I am consistently taking my medicine my life feels normal for the first time in I don’t know when. It is funny though you tell someone you have it and they look at you differently and I am no different than the next person. I am just glad to see people like Glen Close talking about mental illness.



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Your Name

posted October 30, 2009 at 10:46 am


i am rasing my granddaughter she just turned 21 she has bipolar and personality conflicks as well as schozphrenia i can not find the right medication for her bipolard and it gets really awful sometim e i am 67 i am not complaing about rasing her it just she need right medication she also has been diagonizes with her age level as a 14yr old if anyone has a sugesstion about medication i would appreciate the help then i can tell her shrink(cant spell the other haha) i have had her meds switch about 12 times in the last year thank you for all the info that i have been reading. grandma



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Anne

posted November 2, 2009 at 2:47 am


I appreciate Glenn Close’s coming forth with this issue, but mental disorders are not diseases that can be treated. I have a sister who only recently been diagnosed as paranoid schizophrenic. She had suffered a major breakdown after some calamitous accidents in her last few months of medical college. It’s created a completely different person. There were little things we’d notice about her behavior before, but she had previously been a very optimistic, happy person, interested only in work, and we would never have thought anything was wrong. It just went downhill after she failed the grade.
My entire family was supportive, but she has been getting worse and grew increasingly paranoid/violent, refusing to take medications, to sleep or eat sufficiently for almost two years. She started building a bazaar spirituality complex, staying up at nights with the lights on, thinking some unseen thing was constantly pricking her, that our house was set to be bombed, even trying to run away to wander on the highway. She fought when we tried getting her medical attention, even setting our house on fire late into the night and talking about herself and demons in the third person. It was then we had to call police and place her into a mental hospital. Earlier we thought it was simply stress and a breakdown, so she was able to stay at home during that period. It has only been very recently that under court order she must take drugs or have them injected. I was 17 at the time and the next to youngest sister, which would have meant a trial for my divorced mom to have placed two minors in danger at home with a schizo. Thankfully, that didn’t happen. All I can say is that the stress and fear of mental illness is very strong. Medical attention is a must – you simply cannot have such a person staying in your home. Sometimes I have nightmares and it still bothers me. It was like constantly walking on eggshells and even on medication, I try avoiding taking visitation rights. The drugs have made her almost alright, but she has glitches in her behavior and the memory freaks me out every time I think of it. I can’t help thinking I could have died if it hadn’t been for my younger sister who had heard the fire alarm.
Some families might have a relative with a different disorder or a more tame form of schizophrenia. For me, it was like living with a manic murderer.



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Your Name

posted November 13, 2009 at 1:34 am


I have a paranoid schiz. son who is 47 years old. I tried many different living arrangements. The care takers always thought he could live in independent living, where he sold his levis, other people wore his clothing, he finally quit taking his med. After my husband died, I brought him back home. I do beleive once in a while the meds do need to be changed. You just have to watch them closely. In the beginning we used liquid medicine and forced him to take it. He hated it, but it was for his own good. He has had many years of therapy. When he needs his medicine to be changed, I just go to the doctor with him and I do have a doctor that works with me. I am an RN and God lead me in the direction of working with mentally ill for 12 years before my son became paranoid shiz. I have never given up on my son, he has scattered genius level, all the way down to scattered 12 year old. He does help me a lot and has a volunteer job. I do believe you must keep them busy so they have something to focus their mind on. I also have a bipolar daughter who lives in the YWCA and off and on,on the street. She has made up stories about her family and does believe them to be true. I have not be sucessful with her, but I do keep trying. She has not been home for 6 years. Keep praying for your loved ones, and please never give up on them. As far as schiz is concerned, I do believe it is the opposite disease of Parkinson, if we find a cure for the latter, I do believe we will have a cure for schiz which I personally believe is an over production of Dopamine,a neurotransmitter in the brain.



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Lisa

posted November 13, 2009 at 1:36 am


I have a paranoid schiz. son who is 47 years old. I tried many different living arrangements. The care takers always thought he could live in independent living, where he sold his levis, other people wore his clothing, he finally quit taking his med. After my husband died, I brought him back home. I do beleive once in a while the meds do need to be changed. You just have to watch them closely. In the beginning we used liquid medicine and forced him to take it. He hated it, but it was for his own good. He has had many years of therapy. When he needs his medicine to be changed, I just go to the doctor with him and I do have a doctor that works with me. I am an RN and God lead me in the direction of working with mentally ill for 12 years before my son became paranoid shiz. I have never given up on my son, he has scattered genius level, all the way down to scattered 12 year old. He does help me a lot and has a volunteer job. I do believe you must keep them busy so they have something to focus their mind on. I also have a bipolar daughter who lives in the YWCA and off and on,on the street. She has made up stories about her family and does believe them to be true. I have not be sucessful with her, but I do keep trying. She has not been home for 6 years. Keep praying for your loved ones, and please never give up on them. As far as schiz is concerned, I do believe it is the opposite disease of Parkinson, if we find a cure for the latter, I do believe we will have a cure for schiz which I personally believe is an over production of Dopamine,a neurotransmitter in the brain.



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Greg Mills

posted June 25, 2013 at 10:13 am


Thank you for this site and it is my every hope that it continues to share, teach and enlighten. Beyond the unimaginable, relentless darkness for the sufferer, the family endures as well. Four and a half million Americans alone suffer from Treatment Resistant Depression, as well as their family and friends. My family story is found in the book – “Life Chooses Us.’



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