Beyond Blue

Beyond Blue


Video: Humor Heals

posted by Beyond Blue

Apparently I upset a few folks in my recent video, the interview with Eric and Mr. Guardian Angel, “Being Married to a Manic Depressive,” when I used the term “whackjob” to describe MYSELF. I sincerely apologize for offending anyone by my use of that term. I feel I owe you an explanation as to why I use the language I do in “Beyond Blue,” and the importance of humor in my recovery from depression and addiction.To get to my YouTube video, “Beyond Blue: Humor Heals,” click here.To read more Beyond Blue, go to www.beliefnet.com/beyondblue, and to get to Group Beyond Blue, a support group at Beliefnet Community, click here.



Advertisement
Comments read comments(18)
post a comment
Tricia

posted May 14, 2008 at 12:57 pm


Therese,
To quote Mr. Roger’s:
“I like you just the way you are.” ^I^



report abuse
 

momma1

posted May 14, 2008 at 6:33 pm


Therese, I KNOW YOU DONT KNOW ME AND IVE COME UPON YOUR VIDEO A VERY DEAR AND CLOSE FRIEND OF MINE HELPED ME COME IN BEYOND THE BLUE IVE YET NOT REALLY FIGURED OUT HOW TO GET IN CHAT ROOMS WITH PEOPLE LOL I AM NOT A COMPUTER WIZ BY NO MEANS BUT LISTENING TO YOUR VIDEO I JUST WOULD LIKE TO SAY FROM MYSELF I CANT SEE PEOPLE UPSET OR MAYBE I JUST DONT KN OW WHY. I CAN RELATE TO YOU I AM ONE WHO DOES NOT SPEAK OUT ALOT OF MY OWN HIDDEN DEMONS YET I TRY IN SOME WAYS LONG STORY SHORT IN MY OPINION YOU DONT HAVE TO EXPLAIN OR SUGAR COAT HOW YOU FEEL AT THAT TIME WE ARE ALL HUMAN AND JUST KNOW THERE ARE SOME OF US MYSELF UNDERSTAND PLEASE TAKE CARE OF YOURSELF AND FAMILY THE NEW LADY ON THE BLOCK



report abuse
 

Larry Parker

posted May 14, 2008 at 8:25 pm


Therese:
You are the “funnest” person I know. (Well, maybe except for my girlfriend, LOL.) I’m sure your dad is smiling down — make that laughing down — toward you.
Here’s something that happened to me recently, not so good.
I work in a Mike Bloomberg-type “bullpen” in my new job with three other people — a Latino, an African-American, and a Caribbean immigrant. I’m the token white guy of course (which I can call myself because I’m, well, the token white guy).
We usually get along because we all have highly sarcastic senses of humor — ranging from dry to acid.
Anyway, the Caribbean lady was a little grouchy coming in one morning.
The Latino guy promptly said, “Wow, somebody’s bipolar today.”
He, the Caribbean lady and the African-American woman promptly burst out into hysterical laughter. Naturally, I didn’t.
So then he asked me — since for any other joke he would have told I’d be doubled over in hysterics — “Why aren’t you laughing?”
I said, truthfully, “Hey, I’m smiling.” And I was. With the painted-on face of Pagliacci the sad clown.
Mind you, these are among the most socially conscious, leftist people you would ever want to meet (I’m the conservative in the room, and I’m a liberal Democrat) on all matters … except one.
Ugh.



report abuse
 

Tricia

posted May 14, 2008 at 8:38 pm


Momma1,
Welcome to the ((( New Lady on the Block!!!!))) ^I^



report abuse
 

Margaret Balyeat

posted May 15, 2008 at 5:17 am


Momma1: I echo Tricia’s welcome! IMHO, you’ve”stubled upon” the ABSOLUTE BEST site on the internet in terms of finding loving, caring, GIVING people. What you’ll find here EVRY time you visit is a community of kindred spirits who not only WANT to understand, for the most part, they DO. And or inimitable brave blogmistress is ALSO beyond compare! She takes everything her readers “dish out” and yet responds in love and a spirit of reconcilliation (like she has today with this video) which sets the tone for the rest of us to be accepting of each other’s quirks, pet peeves and needs. The wonderful friends I’ve found here are BEYOND THE PALE!!
tHERESE: i’M IN 100% AGREEMENT ABOUT HAVING THE”RIGHT” TO MAKE CERTAIN KINDSOF COMMENTS BRCAUSE WE’VE EARNED it by virtue of our inclusion in a particular group be it by birth(ethnicity), choice(religious affiliation or cirumstance(mental illness) Besides, life is too short to take offense where none has been intended. The freedom to be our true selves here is a result of the fact that you model itfor us on a daily basis! If YOU were to start feeling you must choose your words more carefully, I wager your popularity would take a HUGE dip! NO ONE is FORCED to log on and hear you “poke fun”.I regret tht some have been offended, but you ARE who you are, and most of us are crazy about theperson that is.(Pun intended!) Simply watching/hearing THE NEWS THESE DAYS GIVES US ENOUGH opportunites to cry or be offended;I, for one, am GRATEFUL to know I can come here and nearly always get a chuckle(or at least a smile! ! many blessings upon your head for all the good you do. To paraphrase Billy Joel,”don’t go changin’ to try and please us,you’ve never let us down before…we love you just the way you ARE



report abuse
 

Dylan Croft

posted May 15, 2008 at 7:30 am


I see nothing wrong in using “the words” when we are talking about ourselves. I often refer to myself as nuts or crazy. It’s one way to take the sting out of words that are otherwise offensive. But I also agree that the undiagnosed have not earned the right to use these words, especially when they have no idea what they are talking about. Please, don’t change, Therese. We enjoy you just the way you are.



report abuse
 

Kevin

posted May 15, 2008 at 11:02 am


I’ve not reviewed the negative reviews of the “Eric and Mr. Guardian Angel”. It doesn’t take much to understand how some people might feel offended by the term ‘whackjob’ being tossed around in reference to people suffering from a brain disease. That said an examination of context, intention of the whackjob throwing in around, and time spent earning the trust and ‘right’ cast off the PC chains might permit an attorney to ensure the whackjob doesn’t end up on deathrow.
I have innumerable un-PC terms to describe whackjobs like Therese. Actually, I use them on a fairly routine basis in working with whackjobs. Without exception, use of such terms invariably neutralizes the deadly seriousness and heaviness of being a whackjob. In fact, people seem to enjoy competitions that require rapid verbalization of whackjob synonyms in response to the one just tossed out by the lunatic supposed to be be playing doctor; a certified and proud lunatic I am.
Therese, I hope you will consider doing a video where you go on for a good 7 minutes throwing out all the Un-PC synonyms for head case as you imitate someone with Tourette’s………why not, it’s a blast trading cuss blurts with a talented T-man……..laugh on !



report abuse
 

Susan Fish

posted May 15, 2008 at 1:22 pm


Therese -
Thank you so much for remaining public.
I never would have found you without it…and found out that I, too, am Bipolar…just couldn’t figure out what was going o , but knew that I was off.
In your piece about humor, when you spoke about your Dad saying he was worried about you because he was worried about you not having enough fun – I lost it.
I am also very type A, then never quite complete something even doing extremely well at it for fear of not being good enough, or blowing it or something ( so simply decide to ‘finish later’).
And my Dad before he passed also said to me every time we spoke -
“Go do something fun!” “GO HAVE SOME FUN!”.
Wow…
Thanks
Sue



report abuse
 

Susan Fish

posted May 15, 2008 at 1:25 pm


Oh, Yeah…
I often refer to myself as “Totally Loontickie”
How else can I explain it to someone who hasn’t a clue?
Love & Peace to All
Sue



report abuse
 

Ariana

posted May 16, 2008 at 8:32 am


I think the ppl who got offended were in the wrong link-the OCD blog was a few up on the page;)
Seriously, I think that it’s pretty hypocritical of those that took offense: they want ppl to accept them for who they are, mental illness n all. Yet, they are asking u to be “different” if u want their acceptance, n not to use your humor as a coping method(one that I find works well most of the time!). I also think it was more than appropriate to express this humorous view by referring to YOURSELF-it’s not like u found out a neighbor or friend had a mental illness n u maliciously called them a “whackjob”.
I am 100% behind u as I feel your site raises awareness n seeks acceptance rather than ridicule for those living w/mental illness. Those that were slighted by your comments couldn’t have been loyal site members, or they would know u well enough NOT to be offended.



report abuse
 

Anonymous

posted May 17, 2008 at 7:36 pm


Using Therese’s argument, is it OK for an African American to refer to himself or herself as the “N” word? I guess some would say it would. However, anyone coming up with excuses for using words that would be offensive uttered by others lowers the common discourse of everyone. We simply should not use such terms and have a more civil conversation.
I thought the purpose of this blog was to erase the stigma of mental illness, not perpetuate the stereotypes.
Thanks for considering this point of view.



report abuse
 

Anonymous

posted May 17, 2008 at 7:53 pm


I commented above regarding not using the it’s-OK-if-I-say-whackjob-if-I-am-mentally-ill, but others can’t to make the argument to not use humor to defend offensive language. I wish to amend it by saying that I totally agree that humor is one of the best resources of fighting off depression. Lincoln, who was known to be severely depressed, dealt with his illness by telling humorous tales. It’s not humor itself that is the problem, it’s the nature of the humor.
I am glad Therese apologized for offending others, but she went on to defend herself with a few posts of research on humor and saying why it was OK to say what she said.



report abuse
 

Larry Parker

posted May 19, 2008 at 11:10 am


Anonymous:
I think you need to read the Mad Pride entry in Therese’s blog on Monday.
I take it you would agree with Dr. Torrey that anyone who is “out there” and activist about their disease is just bitter. (Certainly what my parents think …)



report abuse
 

Anonymous

posted May 19, 2008 at 4:33 pm


Larry:
I read the “Mad Pride” article. I don’t agree at all that those who are open about the disease are bitter. I don’t understand the connection, but I often miss the point of things. :)
I guess my bottom line is that it would be helpful if we all decided that “loopy” and “whackjob” and the n-word and other words against certain ethnicities, etc. were just inappropriate no matter who uses them. Justifying who gets to say them only serves to continue their usage.



report abuse
 

Pingback: 9 Ways That Humor Can Heal | World of Psychology

Pingback: 9 Ways Humor Heals | Therese J. Borchard

Pingback: 9 Ways Humor Heals - TodaysMama

Pingback: 9 Ways Humor Heals - Beyond Blue

Post a Comment

By submitting these comments, I agree to the beliefnet.com terms of service, rules of conduct and privacy policy (the "agreements"). I understand and agree that any content I post is licensed to beliefnet.com and may be used by beliefnet.com in accordance with the agreements.



Previous Posts

Seven Ways to Get Over an Infatuation
“Bewitched, bothered, and bewildered am I” wrote US songwriter Lorenz Hart about the feeling of infatuation. It’s blissful and euphoric, as we all know. But it’s also addicting, messy and blinding. Without careful monitoring, its wild wind can rage through your life leaving you much like the

posted 12:46:43pm Feb. 19, 2014 | read full post »

When Faith Turns Neurotic
When does reciting scripture become a symptom of neurosis? Or praying the rosary an unhealthy compulsion? Not until I had the Book of Psalms practically memorized as a young girl did I learn that words and acts of faith can morph into desperate measures to control a mood disorder, that faithfulness

posted 10:37:13am Jan. 14, 2014 | read full post »

How to Handle Negative People
One of my mom’s best pieces of advice: “Hang with the winners.” This holds true in support groups (stick with the people who have the most sobriety), in college (find the peeps with good study habits), and in your workplace (stay away from the drama queen at the water cooler). Why? Because we

posted 10:32:10am Jan. 14, 2014 | read full post »

8 Coping Strategies for the Holidays
For people prone to depression and anxiety – i.e. human beings – the holidays invite countless possibility to get sucked into negative and catastrophic thinking. You take the basic stressed-out individual and you increase her to-do list by a third, stuff her full of refined sugar and processed f

posted 9:30:12am Nov. 21, 2013 | read full post »

Can I Say I’m a Son or Daughter of Christ and Suffer From Depression?
In 1 Thessalonians 5:16-18, we read: “Rejoice always, pray without ceasing, give thanks in all circumstances; for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus for you.” What if we aren’t glad, we aren’t capable of rejoicing, and even prayer is difficult? What if, instead, everything looks dark,

posted 10:56:04am Oct. 29, 2013 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.