Beyond Blue

Beyond Blue


Stephen Colbert’s Exodus Moment

posted by Beyond Blue

stephen%20colbert.jpg
Stephen Colbert was interviewed in a recent issue of “Parade” about his painful past and how he has used his sense of humor to heal. I loved hearing about his “exodus moment” because it resembled mine:
One wintry day in Chicago he was walking down the street and a Gideon handed him a Bible. He flipped it open and read the Sermon on the Mount, the passage about the futility in worrying and in anxiety. About the same time he was apprenticing with the comedy troupe Second City, when all of a sudden he burst into laughter while on-stage (and not on narcotics). He said this about that night, which is a wonderful, wonderful line: “Something burst that night, and I finally let go of the pretension of not wanting to be a fool.”
I LOVE THAT.



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Kevin

posted March 28, 2008 at 2:02 pm


Great post and great one-liner by Colbert. Not sure if I know of a decent comedian who hasn’t either had a rough past or mood disorder. I confess to Almighty God and to you my brothers and sisters that I am a fool”…..Moi.



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Larry Parker

posted March 29, 2008 at 1:11 pm


Colbert and you, Therese, share a very powerful insight in your “Exodus moments” that has to do with boundaries.
When you stop getting people to like you, and just “be yourself” — your flaws, your passions, your virtues, (yes) your illnesses — the people who truly care about you, and who you would really ultimately want in your life, will embrace you more.
And it will relieve such a burden of putting a face on to the world.



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William

posted March 31, 2008 at 2:29 am


Stephen Colbert is truly a great comedian and I never miss The Colbert Report. What is really funny is that
so many – including the objects of his satire – simply don’t “get it.”
I lost my father to a massive heart attack in his sleep at 41. He was a good man who died far too young,
and had always maintained that he would not live to be an old man. On the other hand, I somehow know
that I will live to a crotchety, curmudgeonly old age — and will love every minute of it.
Thank you Mr. Colbert and much continued success to you.
William Trent



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Loral

posted March 31, 2008 at 10:47 am


“I finally let go of the pretension of not wanting to be a fool.” What a perfect way to describe someone who starts believing in themselves more than in other people. Wonderful!



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joe horsley

posted March 31, 2008 at 11:11 am


i grew up in a foster Farm,where there was no commedy,nor was there much laughter.i now get anxious when there is a long period of laughter.i do the best i can to fake all the things that others are enjoying,but i rather be anywhere but there.i am stressed out.how can i overcome,dont say laughter,cause that is a negetive for me.



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David Samuel Mann

posted March 31, 2008 at 11:20 am


I too “tap dance” for people at my own expense. I’m learning to live and do the things I want to, if they do not harm another person.Trying to make someone happy makes a relationship one way.If they cannot except who you are than they are not your friend.



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Nel

posted March 31, 2008 at 11:34 am


JOE, WHERE IS GOD IN YOUR LIFE? START PRAYING ABOUT REALLY ALLOWING GOD TO BRING NEW LIFE TO YOU. YOU DON’T NEED TO BE LIKE THE CROWD OR TRY TO FIT IN WITH THE LAUGHTER. WHEN JESUS IS THE SOURCE OF YOUR LIFE, HAPPINESS AND LAUGHTER WILL FOLLOW.



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Jen

posted March 31, 2008 at 12:14 pm


Everyone has a place in this world, for some it’s comedy. We may not laugh all the time but we need a good chuckle now and again. It boosts the spirit, thanks Colbert.
Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you’re a mile away and you have their shoes.



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Norma

posted March 31, 2008 at 1:01 pm


The mention of a Gideon Bible brought back a funny family story. Funny at my expense. In 1976 I had just purchased my first new car, a,Nova NC and it was a beauty. My two aunts and I went on a road trip from North Central Texas to upstate New York to visit my cousin.
Being avid readers all three of us took our books to read at night before falling asleep. We spent the second night in a small motel in Virginia. The next morning I gathered all of our books and put them into a sack and took them to the car. I was driving. We had gone several miles down the road and I looked in the rear view mirror and saw one of the aunts take her book from her purse. I asked her when she had taken it out of the sack? She replied that she had put it into her purse the night before. I then asked her to look in the sack, because I had put three books in the car. She took all three books from the sack and one was a Gideon Bible. Oh my goodness. I was so overwhelmed with embarrassment. We returned to Texas a different route, but the Gideon Bible was left at the first motel where we spent the night. For years after this happened, I would get letters and phone calls from relatives, posing as law enforcement,motel owners or representative of Gideon Bible Co.,asking for the return of the Bible. Of course this is remembered at every reunion. Now it’s just a big laugh. My cousin says she wants my tombstone to read, “Beware Bible Thief but God Forgave Her”.
With God in my life and lots of humor and laughter, I get through life one day at a time.



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Cyndi

posted March 31, 2008 at 1:38 pm


Dear Joe:
I too spent part of my childhood on a foster farm in LaCenter, Washington in the early ’60s. A tough place to be in the 3rd, 4th and 5th grades. Thankfully, I realized I needed professional help in 1976 to understand my self-destructive decisions. With weekly help from a good support group and Gestalt therapist for nearly a year, I started on the road to recovery. What has surprised me the most these past 30 years is that the “recovery” is not a permanent, static thing. Now when I start to slip into sadness, I stop to thank God for all the wonderful aspects of my life today, then I get busy doing something physical or calling a friend who might need encouraging, etc. I’ll pray for you. Cyndi



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Ted Hodkinson

posted March 31, 2008 at 2:30 pm


The point about Steven Colbert is interesting but how this relates
to Christianity, and being “Christ centered” is that we are called,
as St. Paul said, to be “fools for the Gospel”–not just fools or
foolish. There has to be a purpose, beyond just being calm and
settled in your vocation.
The key is being “seperated unto” your vocation, to be comfortable
and accepting of where and how God asks someone to “step out”
on the ledge of faith, to sacrafice self, in His name, for others.
In that sense, as we are “fools”, so then are we “lights”! Thanks
and peace to all–being foolish for Christ!



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PMMRC

posted March 31, 2008 at 3:01 pm


I get sick of all the “shoulds & shouldn’ts.” Steve Colbert’s story was a nice one about self discovery and getting grounded. Let it go at that. PMMRC



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Rose Marie

posted March 31, 2008 at 3:57 pm


I watch Steven Colbert faithfully every night and think he is just a wonderfully funny and “on target” guy! He boosts my day with a lightness and a humor that just helps me get through. When my son died, two years ago, my heart was heavy, not that it is not heavy a little every day, but not as it was two years ago. I put on Steven on the television and immediately he brought a smile to my face and laughter to my soul! We love the man! My husband John and I look forward to watching this handsome, funny and kind of egotistical man (portrayed that way as part of his demeanor); nearly every night! Rose Marie



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Monique

posted March 31, 2008 at 4:31 pm


I just happened upon this site because I am a fan of Stephen Colbert’s comedy. I was feeling really blue lately….young female minister and educator who buried one parent four years ago and taking care of one with progressing dimensia. I have family around but distant. My bestfriend and baby sister lives in LA. I am really blessed with a great career ( I love being a teacher) and I love helping people as a minister. I wished I had someone to share it with. I just got approve for a home loan, but I wonder who will be there with me to share this wonderful thing called life. Small thing maybe but felt really big.
God blessed me with a great sense of humor. He knows when I need to smile and some of your stories really cheered me up. Especially Bible thief (ha ha ha) Thanks for being used by God to help one of his messengers who was a bit weary on the journey.



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SH ZIEGLER

posted March 31, 2008 at 4:33 pm


DO NOT FORGET COLBERT IS A COMEDIAN WHO SPECIALIZES IN PUTTING PEOPLE ON. IS THIS A BIT?



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Dianne

posted March 31, 2008 at 4:42 pm


I am not an avid TV watcher and have seen very little of Stephen Colbert, but have heard him a few times and he is a funny man. I did not know he had a rough childhood, but not surprised as many comedians have the same background. They have learned to rise from the pain with humor…A wonderful story and warms my heart…how very little I have moved from the idea that appearing foolish is not the way to be…I really should let go once in a while, and do try to. I am much to serious for my own good sometimes. Thanks for sharing this, Therese!



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BETTY DAVIS

posted March 31, 2008 at 6:18 pm


I JUST LOVE STEVEN COLBERT AND I WATCH HIS SHOW. AND HE IS SO HANDSOME THAT HE GIVES US GALS GOOSEBUMPS.HE DESERVES AWARDS AND ACCOLADES BECAUSE HE IS SO AMUSING.HE IS FUN.
loved his story of his ah! ha! moment.



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Ruth Lewis

posted March 31, 2008 at 9:56 pm


I love Steven. He changes things. He brings out the absolute child
in all of us and makes us laugh at ourselves. His political humor
has made me laugh until I cried. I have doubled over with laughter
at his presentation of some facts. We need more guys that make us
forget for a moment the seriousness of our lives. Keep on Keeping on,
Steven.
Ruth Lewis



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Junebug

posted March 31, 2008 at 10:03 pm


I LOOOOVE YOU STEPHEN. TOUCH MY BODY STEPHEN! STEPHEN, STEPHEN! COLBERT, STEPHEN! AHHH IT HURTS SO GOOD STEPHEN.



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craig aubuchon

posted March 31, 2008 at 11:02 pm


foolishness, a form of comedy. Entertainment for God knows how many and growing.Colbert is no fool. Whimsicle and foolishness are a similar way of healing the past. Lets remember that song by Boston…..don’t look back….California Colbert fan



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Anonymous

posted March 31, 2008 at 11:27 pm


Stephen Colbert is funny; that’s no joke. He overcame the sudden, tragic loss of his father and brothers and has risen beyond grief and despair to see himself clearly and bring the gift of laughter to many. I admire him and hope others can follow his example. Don’t be fooled by his on-air persona. He’s a good man. Rev. David V. Mason
davidvmason@yahoo.com



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Carl Sheneberger

posted April 1, 2008 at 12:05 am


Cheers for that Gideon and the Bible! That Book works wonders.



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Barbara Saxe

posted April 1, 2008 at 7:13 am


I went to the Stephen Colbert article and everything is blue. What’s up I can’t even read it.



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DPM fan, NY

posted April 1, 2008 at 1:53 pm


His comedy is Brilliant. I get better news from him than CNN.



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Steve Weiss

posted April 1, 2008 at 4:04 pm


Colbert is far from the conventional comedy drone. He always surprises and uplifts, even when delivering fair material. He is a strongly gifted person. Perhaps Colbertology is a viable religion for the masses. I am certain HE would agree!



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lokywoky

posted April 6, 2008 at 6:15 pm


Congratulations to Steven for winning a Peabody Award – that is one of the highest awards in journalism. This one was his and his alone (he shared one with Jon Stewart on the Daily Show). He exclaimed about it “They give these to 60 Minutes!”
He deserves it!
Hooray for him!



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Pingback: 9 Ways That Humor Can Heal | World of Psychology

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