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Beginner's Heart

Beginner's Heart

the 2nd best and most important job ever

taylor mali and zen pencilsTwo of my favourite things — actually four, if you include the ‘zen’ and ‘pencils’ as material objects… :). Teachers & poetry. And if you include social activism on behalf of teachers? You have knocked that homer out of the PARK.

Because only family makes a bigger impact on a child than his or her teachers do. Only family can love you more than a dedicated teacher. And only teachers do it in spite of cultural warfare against them.

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No one is bashing on parents, grandparents, aunts & uncles. But the whole country seems to feel that teachers are individually & collectively responsible for every societal evil, from illiteracy to violence.

Really, folks? What happened to respect for a very difficult job, made increasingly  more so by completely unrealistic standards, ‘accountability’ strategies, and the spiraling poverty of so many American families? What happened to the respect shown by other cultures (where, interestingly enough, kids are ‘testing’ far better) to teachers?

I adore this poem by Taylor Mali. I’ve sent it to many friends, referenced it in lectures, and otherwise honoured it. I also love the cartoon blog Zen Pencils, where Buddhism meets popular culture. Put them together w/ a profound love & respect for teachers, and you have a trifecta.

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If you don’t believe teachers are the 2nd most important job around, think again: Who taught you to read beyond the ABCs of home? Who taught you to write? Who was there for you when you struggled with math that gets you through everyday functions? Who read misspelled, ungrammatical paper after paper, checking first for content before s/he corrected the errata? Who honoured your voice, your thoughts, your own heart? Can any of us who attended school say there was never a teacher who made a profound difference in our lives?

I’m an education junkie, to be fair. I seem to be unable to stay away from school — in one form or another — for most of my life. Either I’ve been in it, been volunteering at my sons’ schools, or I’ve been teaching. Since … well, kindergarten (rather a long time ago, just FYI).

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So my list of folks who influenced me is darn near as long. Mrs. Parker in 3rd (or was it 4th?) grade, who made work harder than the other kids who ‘weren’t capable of more.’ Madame Sabatini in elementary French, who instilled in me a love for the liquidity of French that has not abandoned me. Mrs. Gatti, who taught me that World History was fascinating — another love that has changed the way I see all things. Mrs. Saluja, who turned me on to Russian lit, and gave me windows into how people have lived for centuries.

And don’t forget the professors I had in college — Dr. Weathers, who showed me that literature was more than who wrote it: it was also how we read it. My beloved ersatz godmother, Fran, who showed me that poetry is wings. And her husband Manly, who showed me it was also a window.

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Not to mention my sons’ teachers, who taught me that teaching is a gift given daily, to the children in our care. Mrs. Aydelotte, who turned my sons on to learning. Mrs. Lady-in-the-Office, who showed my younger son that science needs discipline.

And the mentors who got me through graduate school — both colleagues and professors. Who gave me craft that has sustained me, theory that has deepened me. And the wherewithal to make my passion into a living (however modest!)

In other words? Teachers have always been there for me. And for my sons. And yes, a few — a very few — aren’t great. But overall? There is nothing except family ties I find more important. And I’d trade several family members (no one who reads my blog!) for teachers I know. Because Taylor Mali is telling it EXACTLY like it is:

Teachers make a difference.

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in praise of grandparents

granddad letter to homophobic daughterI LVE this letter from a grandfather to his gay-hating daughter. The idea that there is shame attached to gender makes me crazy. I can’t imagine disowning a child for anything, and something as fixed as gender identification?? If it ever came to not speaking to one of my sons — which seems impossible — it would be far more likely to be in a case of overt cruelty, like this mother.

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Once, many years ago, race occupied a similarly fraught place in American culture. (Some of us would contend it still does, if a bit differently.) For a young white female to date a black boy was heresy — not to be condoned. Even in an international community, old prejudices lived and breathed.

But when my father had me formally deported as a result of my declared intention to marry my African-American boyfriend (deportation being necessary to prevent me returning, as I was 18), my grandmother — a Texan born & bred, from a time when that normally meant racial ‘attitudes’ — took me in and loved me.

She said nothing to reprimand me, and although my father had said I could never see my sisters or my mother again, my grandmother assured me that things would change. She held my shattered heart in her arthritic blue-veined hands and helped it heal. Such is the power of grandparent love. Emma

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This letter reminds me that grandparents are necessary. No one questions that parents are critical. But as children grow and decide their own life choices, there is need for love that does not question. Love that accepts a child as s/he is, not as prejudices and hate might desire. I miss my old ladies: the grandmother who rocked a big 18-year-old girl in her lap and soothed her tears, the great-aunt who never asked a single question about my precipitous, unaccompanied return — just cooked me cobblers & creamed corn.

When I think of the best kinds of love, I think of grandparents. I remember what it is to be accepted w/out question. Just held and loved and loved some more. And I wish I was capable of it more often.

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tea and sympathy

tea & cookies2This has NOT been a good week. It’s gone steadily downhill since Monday… :( But it’s taken a turn for the better, and it’s all because I did a shamefully easy good deed: I lent 1/4 jar of molasses to my next-door neighbour.

Laura was making her beloved sister’s recipe of iced ginger cookies, and realised she didn’t have enough molasses. Turns out, I had plenty — even the right type & brand! A few hours later, Laura appeared at our door, fragrant warm cookies in hand. How cool is THAT?

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Not only did Laura bring the cookies: she returned a full jar of molasses and a hand-written recipe card! Old-fashioned goodness is alive and well. Right next door!

So I made tea, and ate home-made ginger cookies (my family’s FAVOURITES), and life is once again good. Of course, now I have to try out the hand-written recipe and make an entire batch, so I can take some back to Laura. The sacrifices we make. :)

If your week has been equally disrupted by the shutdown, by the partisan name-calling, by your own anger (as mine has!), make some cookies. Brew some tea while they’re cooling. Invite a friend over. And then sit down and remember: all we have is this moment. Why waste it on being unhappy? Try some old-fashioned goodness instead.

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the blame game, compromise, and windows

blame gameYesterday I overdosed on politics. I read blog after article after news piece after FB post. Ugh. I was left more than slightly nauseous, and wondering how American politics came to such an ugly place.

Of course I have my own interpretation of what’s going on, but what saddens me is that politics now seems to be far more about pseudo-religious principles than representation of the American people as a whole. I’m a firm believer in separation of church & state. As a long-time resident overseas — where religious law was the main law — and as a woman in a male-dominated world, I’m pretty sensitive to having other folks put their religious beliefs on me. And what seems pretty sad is that most Americans would NOT want someone else’s religious principles used as whips on them.

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More wars have been committed in the name of religion — even if greed was the real focus — than in the name of any other ‘principle.’ For something that’s supposed to bring peace on earth, religion is fraught with.. well, violence. The Crusades, the Spanish Inquisition, Thirty Years Wars, Lebanese Civil War, Israel vs Palestine…the list is long.

peace on earth parade balloon

Tulsa Parade of Lights

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Plus, it’s hard to get people to talk rationally about their spiritual beliefs. Folks don’t want to ‘compromise’ on religion. An example: In Tulsa, we had a Christmas Parade for years. Then a couple of years ago, the word Christmas was dropped, in an effort to include other religions as well. A large number of Christians were upset, and split off to hold their own parade.

This year, efforts on behalf of including Christmas in the title were successful, and it was renamed the Tulsa Downtown Parade of Lights: a celebration of Christmas, Hanukkah and other holidays. Unfortunately, this wasn’t enough. The original splinter group apparently wanted only the word Christmas included, and no inclusion of other religions or winter holidays. In other words, like many groups these days, ‘compromise’ really meant ‘my way or the highway.’ So they did just that, this splinter group: moved their parade down the highway.

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An aside: Tulsa has a very active Jewish population, as well as large Muslim & Hindu groups. Not to mention your Buddhists, like yours truly. Wouldn’t it be nice if we could all get together as Tulsa neighbours and celebrate our similarities, especially the children of Abraham? And please: don’t tell me that Christianity is marginalised. It’s the dominant religion of the country, folks. Try saying you’ve converted to Islam, as a friend of my son has. THAT will get you marginalised.

windowHere’s what I wish for us, as a friend with four children wonders how she will feed them, since WIC is closing during the government shutdown. Here’s what I hope for, as elderly widows on food stamps wonder how they will eat, and parents  at Tinker are furloughed without pay. I hope and wish that somehow we can return to seeing each other as fellow travelers, wanting only the best (including health care!) for each other. Not antagonists who must somehow win in what should never have been a fight, but cordial colleagues who may well disagree. My sister is a Christian. I’m not. But I can respect her devotion, and love her for it. Why must difference be a wall? Why can’t it be a window, looking somewhere unfamiliar, but beautiful?

As the old song says, Why can’t we be friends? (Even if you’re in the CIA… :))

 

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