Awake in the World

Awake in the World

Money Energy: Bringing Together the Sacred and Profane

posted by debramoffitt

Take charge of your money. It doesn’t matter who you are, how you see yourself, how unworldly and non-materialistic you want to be, you can’t get away with ignoring it.- Lesley Garner

In American culture we hold attitudes about money that say money and spirituality are mutually exclusive. “It’s easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to go to heaven,” is one attitude that prevails. So when people embark on the spiritual path they may imagine that money is evil. Money itself has no quality, rather its characteristic depends on how it is used. I love the idea that money is energy. It represents stored energy and resources. When we use it in a spiritual way, in a way that is not associated with greed, then it can be put to work to help many people.

Money is a highly charged topic. Becoming a slave to it through the use of credit cards and excessive desires for things will hinder us. I love Benjamin Franklin’s old adage, “Money is a great servant and a terrible master.” This just about sums it up. When we’re in charge of our desires and limit them, we remain on top. When we let the desires overun us then we can fall under an avalanche of debt.

For today, take a moment to examine your thoughts, feelings and attitudes about money. Do you consider it evil? Do you let it rule you? How do you choose to use it? By becoming fully conscious of how we use this energy, we will have more control over our lives and learn to live with money as a friend, not an enemy.

Bio: Debra Moffitt is author of Awake in the World: 108 Practices to Live a Divinely Inspired Life. A visionary and teacher, she’s devoted to nurturing the spiritual in everyday life. She leads workshops on spiritual practices at the Sophia Institute and other venues in the U.S. and Europe. Her mind/body/spirit articles, essays and stories appear in publications around the globe and were broadcast by BBC World Services Radio. She has spent over fifteen years practicing meditation, working with dreams and doing spiritual practices. Visit her online at http://www.awakeintheworld.com.

Dance with the Divine

posted by debramoffitt

Dance can elevate a soul to the divine. When the Sufi mystic, Rumi walked through the market, he heard the jewelry makers hammering gold. Through the pounding, he heard the voice of God and the rhythmic sounds and energy moved him into a state of divine ecstasy. Rumi, always in love with God and seeing God in all things, began to dance. He whirled and spun in circles, moved by the rhythms of life.

Some cultures and religions discourage dance as an expression of Divine energy. But Rumi experienced his body as a true temple. A friend of mine also uses dance as a sort of divine therapy. Whenever she feels tense, down or simply needs to loosen up, she puts on her favorite music and moves around freely in her basement where no one will see or judge her. It’s a joyous release. Dance can also be an expression of grief. A belly dancer who lost her son did a tribute through dance to the grief and sadness she felt at his departing. Her chorography moved the audience deeply, particularly since many of them knew of her personal tragedy.

Dance was also used by the Shakers, a hard-working, devout religious sect that sprang up in the 18th century. They were known for their passionate and ecstatic dances that were celebrations of the divine spirit. Because of their physical movements, they became known as the “shakers.”

If you’re inspired, find a quiet, private place, turn on your music and dance. Let your body sway and bounce freely. Imagine that you’re dancing with God. What a fun partner!

Bio: Debra Moffitt is author of Awake in the World: 108 Practices to Live a Divinely Inspired Life. A visionary and teacher, she’s devoted to nurturing the spiritual in everyday life. She leads workshops on spiritual practices at the Sophia Institute and other venues in the U.S. and Europe. Her mind/body/spirit articles, essays and stories appear in publications around the globe and were broadcast by BBC World Services Radio. She has spent over fifteen years practicing meditation, working with dreams and doing spiritual practices. Visit her online at http://www.awakeintheworld.com.

Do Not Harm: A Deep Practice of Non-violence

posted by debramoffitt

When I despair, I remember that all through history the ways of truth and love have always won. – Mahatma Gandhi

Non-violence is an elevated way of being. Many of us are raised with feelings of, “an eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth.” But moving to a place where vengeance and forgiveness take precedent over payback is a way of also elevating all of the human race. Many people were introduced to the practice of non-violence or ahimsa, as it’s called in Sanskrit, by Mahatma Gandhi. The small, thin Gandhi began a movement to liberate India from British rule through his ideas of passive resistance. In his personal life Gandhi took these ideas deeply to heart, considering that to harm in action is not sufficient. A true practice of non-violence must extend to the ways we speak and even more deeply, to the ways we think.

Gandhi’s influence spread around the world. Martin Luther King, Jr. was inspired by him and used his ideas and practices in the freedom marches in the south. Instead of using violence to effect change, Gandhi created marches and encouraged Indians to make home-spun cloth and other Indian products including salt as ways to overcome British domination.

A recent example of the practice of non-violence comes from Rasi Bruhyani. A Muslim, he was shot as he worked in a gas station by a man upset by the 9/11 attacks. Bruhyani later went on to try to save the life of the man who attacked him, saying he “went through a healing process and learned from his mistake.” His assailant was convicted of murder, but Bruhyani says that his own practices as a Muslim brought him to forgive and he protested against the death penalty. “Hate is not a solution. Killing is not a solution,” Rasi says.

Non-violence, at its deepest means paying attention to speech. The tongue can create wounds that may not heal. Ahimsa means acting in ways that will not cause pain or suffering to others. On the subtle level it means taking care to watch thoughts so that they do not send out harmful energy and ideas. The practice of non-violence, when taken to heart, is a great challenge that will also bring great rewards. Today, will you accept the challenge to watch your thoughts, words and actions?

Bio: Debra Moffitt is author of Awake in the World: 108 Practices to Live a Divinely Inspired Life. A visionary and teacher, she’s devoted to nurturing the spiritual in everyday life. She leads workshops on spiritual practices at the Sophia Institute and other venues in the U.S. and Europe. Her mind/body/spirit articles, essays and stories appear in publications around the globe and were broadcast by BBC World Services Radio. She has spent over fifteen years practicing meditation, working with dreams and doing spiritual practices. Visit her online at http://www.awakeintheworld.com.

Yoga Reflections: Putting the Teachings into Practice

posted by debramoffitt

“Yoga is the cessation of agitation of the mind.”  - Yoga Sutras of Pantajali

The word, yoga, comes from the ancient Indian language, Sanskrit. It literally means “to bind one to” or to yolk someone to something. In the ancient practices the breath binds one to the universal life breath that we all share. Focusing on breath and awareness connects us to God and a deeper sense of oneness with the Divine. Elena Bower, co-founder of the Virayoga in New York City has made yoga a lifestyle and a career. She has practiced for over fourteen years and leads yoga events in eclectic environments like the New York’s MoMA and on the Great Lawn at Central Park. I asked her about what yoga means to her and how to put it into practice every day. Here’s what works for her.

Debra: How do you find ways to integrate yoga into daily life?

Elena: I try to pause before I let myself get angry, I try to listen to what’s being said rather than formulating my opinion before the other person has finished, and I take 15 minutes per day to practice. Usually more, but at least 15.

Debra: What is the best practice for a beginner who wants to experience more calm?

Elena: No TV for one week. During TV time that week, go to Yogaglo.com and for the cost of one class per month, you can practice with a selection of the most creative, authentic, gifted teachers on the planet, as much as you wish.

Debra: What advice do you offer to other mothers on the spiritual path?

Elena: Be an adventurer with your kids, take them to unexpected places, show them what it means to be both completely adaptable and utterly fallible- which means to say you’re sorry when you’re wrong. And be lovingly firm with boundaries; they will thank you later – always tell them you love them and find something good in those moments.

Debra: Who was your best teacher and why?

Elena: My ex-husband, now my dear friend. My experience with him continues to show me my strength, wisdom and power. His growing receptivity to what is possible for us and our family is giving me the key to my own greatness.

Debra: What is the deeper meaning of yoga?

Elena: To locate within your body your most steady, receptive, attentive listening.

Bio: Debra Moffitt is author of Awake in the World: 108 Practices to Live a Divinely Inspired Life. A visionary and teacher, she’s devoted to nurturing the spiritual in everyday life. She leads workshops on spiritual practices at the Sophia Institute and other venues in the U.S. and Europe. Her mind/body/spirit articles, essays and stories appear in publications around the globe and were broadcast by BBC World Services Radio. She has spent over fifteen years practicing meditation, working with dreams and doing spiritual practices. Visit her online at http://www.awakeintheworld.com.

Previous Posts

Discovering You're Enough with a Leap of Perception
If you’re feeling hemmed in and know that there’s much more to you than what you’re currently experiencing but don’t know quite how to access it, then “Leap of Perception,” by Penney Peirce deserves a read. Penney wrote about working with dreams and intuition long before working with eit

posted 10:16:51am Sep. 18, 2013 | read full post »

How Joy Finds Us: Interview with Mark Nepo
The things we need arrive at the right time, and so it has been with Mark Nepo and his work. For those of us on a spiritual path, Mark’s writings possess the power to immediately move us into connection with a subtle and powerful awareness at the deepest, most soulful level. Though Mark Nepo‘s w

posted 9:42:16am Jul. 16, 2013 | read full post »

Hot Rituals to Celebrate the Summer Solstice
Can you feel the excitement in the air? The days are hot and sunny, and summer officially begins this week on June 21st. It’s the longest day and the shortest night in the Northern hemisphere. I love this day. In the South of France it’s celebrated by jumping over bonfires as a way to gain cour

posted 7:27:32am Jun. 20, 2013 | read full post »

When Spirit Moves Us Out of Our Comfort Zone to Grow
Stepping onto the spiritual path isn’t all peace and roses. It pushes us into a place that moves us beyond our usual comfort zone. As we attune to the highest within us and listen to inner guidance, that guidance sometimes pushes us to try new jobs, to stretch into new creative projects, and to so

posted 8:04:01am Jun. 18, 2013 | read full post »

When Life Races By Replace Stress and Anxiety with Gentle Awareness
Even though I’m a seasoned traveler I still get stressed before trips. It’s not big jitters, just a general anxiety about: 1) Did I pack everything? 2) Will my travel connections go smoothly? And 3) What about the unexpected? Movement brings agitation. Sitting in meditation is easiest for me for

posted 5:26:35am May. 28, 2013 | read full post »


Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.