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Astrological Musings


Red Ice Creations is a riveting site with lots to offer the conspiracy-minded and seekers of truth and interesting miscellany. A recent article linked from Red Ice suggests the idea that the Sun actually is god, and the so-called Sun gods that share a common mythology represent the Sun itself.

The author quotes from a book called The Christ Conspiracy: The Greatest Story Ever Sold:

The solar mythos, in fact, explains why the narratives of the sons of God previously examined are so similar, with a godman who is crucified and resurrected, who does miracles and has 12 disciples, etc. To wit, these stories were in actuality based on the movements of the sun through the heavens. In other words, Jesus Christ and the others upon whom he is predicated are personifications of the sun, and the gospel fable is merely a repeat of a mythological formula revolving around the movements of the sun through the heavens.

The Winter Solstice is associated with a number of dying and resurrected gods (the article cites sixteen different cultures). The Red Ice article goes on to list qualities of these resurrected gods:

# The sun “dies” for three days at the winter solstice, to be born again on December 25th.

# The Sun of God is “born of a virgin,” which refers to both the new or “virgin” moon and the constellation of Virgo.

# The Sun’s “birth” is attended by the “bright star,” either Sirius/Sothis or the planet Venus, and by the “Three Kings,” representing the three stars in the belt of Orion.

# The sun at its’ zenith, or 12 noon, is in the house or heavenly temple of the “Most High;” thus, “he” begins “his father’s work” at “age” 12. Jordan Maxwell relates, “At that point, all Egypt offered prayers to the “Most High God.”

# The Sun enters into each zodiac sign at 30 degrees; hence, the “Sun of God” begins his ministry at “age” 30. The Sun of the visible heavens has moved northward 30 degrees and stands at the gate of Aquarius, the water-bearer, or John the Baptist of the mystic planisphere, and here begins his work of ministry in Palestine.

# The “Sun of God” is the “Carpenter” who builds his daily “houses” of 12 two-hour divisions.

# The “followers” or “disciples” of the “Sun of God” are the 12 signs of the zodiac, through which the Sun must pass.

# The “Sun of God” “changes water into wine” by creating rain, ripening the grape on the vine and fermenting the grape juice.

# The “Sun of God” “walks on water,” referring to its’ reflection upon the waters’ surface.

# The “Sun of God” “calms the sea,” as he rests in the boat of heaven. (Matthew 8:23-27)

# When the “Sun of God” is annually and monthly re-born, he brings life to his former self, raising it from the dead.

# The “Sun of God” triumphantly “rides an ass and her foal” into the “City of Peace” when it enters the sign of Cancer, which contains two stars called “little asses,” and reaches its’ fullness.

# The “Sun of God” is the “Lion” when in Leo, the hottest time of the year, called the “throne of the Lord.”

# The “Sun of God” is “betrayed” by the constellation of the Scorpion, the backbiter, the time of the year when the solar hero loses his strength. [NOTE: This is also the origin of the term backstabber, which also indicates betrayal].

# The “Sun of God” is hung on a cross, which represents its’ passing through the equinoxes, the vernal equinox being Easter [from the pagan festival Eostre].

# The “Sun of God” darkens when it “dies.” The solar god as the sun of evening or autumn was the suffering, dying Sun, or the dead sun buried in the netherworld.

# The “Sun of God” is with us “always, to the close of the age,” (Matthew 28:20) referring to the ages of the procession of the equinoxes. [NOTE: The procession of the equinoxes takes 26,000 years to complete one cycle.]

# The “Sun of God” is the “Light of the World” and “comes on clouds, and every eye shall see him.”

# The “Sun of God” rising in the morning is the “Savior of mankind.”

# The “Sun of God” wears a corona, a “crown of thorns,” or halo.

The article goes on to analyze DaVinci’s “The Last Supper” and the concept of illumination. It’s an interesting read and opens a door to many new questions.

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