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Courtesy of Huffington Post, here are a bunch of photographs  giving a sense of how this time of years speaks to so many worldwide.

Tonight I am going to a celebration of the Solstice, and tomorrow to another where I will be acting as the High Priest.  It will be a wonderful end to a year that, for me personally, has been very very […]

I was delighted to discover a long discussion of the African Orixa Xango (in Spanish, Shango or Chango) in Daily Kos, and want to pass it on. Years ago when I first encountered the African Diasporic traditions I was identified as […]

This is an important press release, and while I will be far away overseeing an academic conference, I hope any readers in the area will help support this effort. Silver Spring, MD, October 19th, 2011   Priestesses and priests from the […]

Today I read two thought provoking pieces that cross traditional divides while addressing key issues in environmental thought. In both cases I think a Pagan sensibility brings new and valuable insights to the table.

One of the most fascinating issues distinguishing Pagan spirituality from most forms of monotheism is that we see the world and its basic dimensions from birth to death as sacred expressions of the more than human, with which we seek […]

I was started along this line of thought while reading Kent Nerburn’s powerful, moving, painful and hauntingly beautiful The Wolf at Twilight: An Indian Elder’s Journey through a Land of Ghosts and Shadows. There are many levels to this book, […]

One of the most unexpected aspects of my Yukon adventure was the very different ‘feel’ of country where humanity’s technological imprint is an unpaved road with no dwellings or other roads for over 100 miles – and for many hundreds […]

This is beautiful. Lammas Blessings to all.

Lammas, or Lughnasad, is the first and greatest of the Sabbats honoring the harvest, for it is now that in most places in the northern hemisphere life’s abundance most overflows in flowers and fruit, grain and root.  In our urban […]

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