A Moment of Change

There are several signs to be on the lookout for to
determine if you hare passing the point of just enjoying your online time to
becoming addicted to having constant updates as to what everyone you know is
doing. With the new smartphones, iPads, tablets and everything else it is now
easier than ever to stay socially plugged in, but is there a risk to our mental
health because of this constant bombardment of information?

When considering your use of technology do you find that:

  1. You simply have to have access to your social
    media sites at all times?
  2. You ask people you are talking to wait or
    “hold that thought” when you see a new post has been added or someone
    has made a comment on your accounts?
  3. You avoid activities that limit your ability to
    stay connected to the online world?
  4. You are sneaking time at work or from your
    family to connect with people online that you have never actually met?
  5. You fill uneasy or uncomfortable when you cannot
    have access to the internet in some form?
  6. You lie to others about your online time or your
    Facebook, Twitter or social media use?

Internet use and addiction has become an area of controversy
with many addiction therapists, counselors and experts in the field. There is
no doubt that some people have addictive like behaviors around the use of
social media and the need to constantly be in touch. Recognizing the line
between enjoyment of the social media and an addiction is often problematic,
especially as younger and younger people grow up with constant access to their
online world and friends.

At the point where the need to be online starts to create
problems at work, home or in a relationship there is a strong possibility there
is an addictive component. Talking to an addiction specialist to learn ways to
control the behavior and prevent loss of family, friends, employment and
relationships is critical in developing a balanced approach to life and

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