Jesuism

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jcarlinbn
1/25/2007 11:25 AM
1 out of 7

Jesuism in the West is an atheistic worldview based on the teachings of Jesus as documented in the Gospels including the recently discovered Gnostic Gospels of Thomas and Judas. A Jesuist rejects the supernatural accretions to the stories about Jesus as mnemonic and marketing devices typical of the age, and rejects all theistic references including self-references by Jesus as metaphorical devices to communicate with the prevailing Jewish and Pagan religions.

To understand Jesuism one must understand the concept of radical respect for all people taught by Jesus in the Beatitudes, the Good Samaritan, the Adulteress, and indeed in all the stories involving Jesus directly. While Jesus believed in the eventual judgment by his God to help formulate and sell the radical concept that all people are to be accepted as brothers and sisters, the Jesuist will accept this as part of the religious culture Jesus dedicated his life to changing. Jesus was a Jew who believed in the Abrahamic God concept, but his rebellion was as much against his own God as the religion of the Jews he was immersed in.

The Jefferson Bible is a useful condensation of the traditional teachings of Jesus and could be considered the Holy Book of the Jesuist. And part of the traditional Unitarian “Affirmation”
Unitarians believe in
…the brotherhood of man,
the leadership of Jesus,
and the progress of mankind…
[In poetry "man" and "mankind" are generic and include all people]
could be the creed of the Jesuist if there were a creed.

Jesuism is an inclusive rather than an exclusive religion, and does not reject the lessons that can be learned in any and all of the traditional theistic religions. Jesuists may be found in any church, usually Christian, but have in common the rejection of the concept of the Christ, and indeed all of Paul, the rejection of God as a source of meaning and purpose in life, and an exclusive focus on living.

The Jesuist affirms that all people are expected to be contributors to the wellbeing and betterment of all. Some will fail, but this is not an intrinsic propensity to fail, it is simply inability to succeed. For the Jesuist the measure is not global but local. If one can provide for the wellbeing and betterment of one other person: a child, a friend, a random stranger on the street, the Jesuist will echo Jesus “As you have done unto the least of these, you have done unto me.”

J’Carlin



TheWallflower
1/25/2007 9:02 PM
2 out of 7

I typed Jesuism into Wikipedia and got nothing. I then typed Jesusism and got a hit. Is Jesusism the same thing, but an alternate spelling?

It sounds like the basic point of Jesuism is love your neighbor as yourself - radical inclusiveness to the point of no distinguishing in-group/out-group. Perhaps it's similar to Martin Buber's I & Thou?

Question: Jesus, being an ancient Jew, would have believed in God, etc., even if he didn't think of himself as the son of God (this being a later development by his followers). Isn't Jesuism therefore a departure, a corruption if you may, of what Jesus taught?



jcarlinbn
1/26/2007 12:52 AM
3 out of 7

TheWallflower 1/25/2007 9:02 PM --6
I typed Jesuism into Wikipedia and got nothing. I then typed Jesusism and got a hit. Is Jesusism the same thing, but an alternate spelling?
*Grin* I typed Jesuism into Google to make sure the name was in the public domain. The only hit I got was for some Nigerian group. Hence “in the West.” No Jesusism is not the same thing.

J’Carlin



jcarlinbn
1/26/2007 1:47 AM
4 out of 7

TheWallflower 1/25/2007 9:02 PM --6
It sounds like the basic point of Jesuism is love your neighbor as yourself - radical inclusiveness to the point of no distinguishing in-group/out-group. Perhaps it's similar to Martin Buber's I & Thou?
It sounds like you are a Jesuist.

The only problem I have with Buber is the theistic premise of “Thou”

J’Carlin


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