Nanotechnology Will Reshape Humanity

Suffering doesn't make us better people. We should embrace technology that helps us overcome it.

MatthewJ

03/26/2008 07:48:53 PM

Also shocking is his, "Ethicists should be concerned about those actions that are humane and good rather than those actions that infringe on some abstract and inviolable notion of what it means to be human." What does he _think_ Ethics is about? Of _course_ it is for and about _human_ beings. So the concern must be first and foremost: what _does_ it mean to be human. After all, every good book on ethics, ever since Aristotle's Ethics, has kept this first and foremost. That is _why_ the Nicomachean Ethics starts out with discussing the "summum bonum", the teleological end for all things, especially humans. An act that infringes on being human _cannot_ be good.

MatthewJ

03/26/2008 07:45:40 PM

I am amazed that an ethicist -- whether 'bioethicist' or any other type -- could say something as glib as, "find nothing noble or proper in the retention of our imperfections, particularly when it comes to diseases and the ravages of aging." What? Has he never understood why Christian Faith sees the Providence of God in allowing suffering and even death? Has he never read Ecclesiasticus? How can he pass himself off as an ethicist without first _thoroughly_ familiarizing himself with these principles?

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