B-log

Beliefnet's weblog of religion and spirituality in the news and on the internet

Continued from page 2

Diamond Dust

It used to be that Victorian folks would take a snippet of hair from a deceased loved one and carry it in a locket or intricately weave it into a piece of jewelry.

LifeGems

brings mourning jewelry into the twenty-first century with the LifeGem Diamond. Available in round cut, princess cut, or radiant cut, "the LifeGem is a certified, high quality diamond created from the carbon of your loved one as a memorial to their unique and wonderful life," according to the company's website. It does take time to create a LifeGem, just as it takes time to produce a natural diamond. But isn't a few months' wait worth it? After all, a diamond is forever.





National Day of Prayer

Tomorrow marks the 53rd

National Day of Prayer

. The official NDOP website, which explains that the day is not meant to be an exclusively Christian event, offers a suggested list of

people to pray for

and a state-by-state

guide to events

. For the second year in a row, American nonbelievers are countering with their own

National Day of Reason

Advertisement

.





Bond. Jewish Bond.

Sean Connery, famous for playing 007 and for his sexy Scottish brogue, will be playing a Jewish Holocaust survivor in his next film. In "Josiah's Canon," a 2005 release from 20th Century Fox, Connery's character will

lead a group of bank robbers

into a high-security Swiss bank to reclaim money deposited by Jews before World War II.





Denver Doctor Hammers Hindus

E-mail is flying among Hindus outraged by an April 28

Denver Post column

in which an African doctor working in Colorado called Hinduism inherently racist. Pius Kamau, a Kenyan-born thoracic surgeon who writes a biweekly column for the Post, says Hindu notions of caste are ingrained and claims that "to Hindus, blacks are a rung below Untouchables." Saying Indians in his East Africa home looked down on their black neighbors, Kamau writes "Hindus can't help themselves. Humanity exists in a rigid chamber in Hinduism; one's caste never changes. Brahmins are empowered; lower castes enslaved. Blacks fit nicely within this group."



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