The Purim Holiday

Among all Jewish High Holidays, Purim is one of the most festive, fun, and entertaining! Learn about the origin and traditions of this Jewish celebration.

BY: Beliefnet Staff - Sharon Henig

 

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Giving to charities and to the poor

. Once again, the unity of the Jewish people who stood undivided, during the most uncertain and dangerous times to its own existence, is what places a special emphasis on giving. In Judaism, showing gratitude for what we have whether is a little or a lot, means that we have the moral obligation to remember and to include the less fortunate among us. I grew up in this spirit. My Dad (G-d bless His memory) always taught me and my brother that for each two coins – one will go to a charity and the other one we will keep it, to ourselves. Jewish people are commended to practice the gift of giving year round, however during Purim it is customarily to give (money) to anyone who asks, not just to the needy, although there is a maximum of two coins.


4.  Eating a festive meal and yes...drinking lots of wine!!! In fact this holiday mandates to drink until we are so drunk that we must not know the difference between the evil Haman and the respectable Mordachai.  Last but not least making lots of noise anytime Haman’s name is said out loud become a custom and is especially embraced by children. As the Story of Purim taught us about the children that Haman wanted to kill first, now the children are those who eradicate Haman’s name. Likewise, the Purim cookies called Humantashen or Haman’s Ears are called so because it reminds of Haman’s ears and the shape of his triangle hat.


Purim honors Mordachai and Queen Esther by setting a mark of respect and distinction on their courage and willingness to sacrifice their lives to save those of their people. Purim is celebrated so lively and joyfully because we are so happy to be alive today and be able to reiterate God marvelous Miracles during Hag Purim.


Have a Happy Purim Holiday!
 

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Related Topics: Faith, Purim, Jewish Holidays

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