Approaching the High Holy Days as Jews

The start of the Jewish New Year, the month of Tishrei, is filled with holy days, among them four foundational celebrations: Rosh haShanah, Yom haKippurim, Sukkot and Simchat Torah-Shemini Atzeret.

BY: Adin Even-Israel Steinsaltz

A shofar resting upon a hebrew book
 

The start of the Jewish New Year, the month of Tishrei, is filled with holy days, among them four foundational celebrations: Rosh haShanah, Yom haKippurim, Sukkot and Simchat Torah-Shemini Atzeret. They are as different from one another as possible.

Yet, we may also think of all four holidays as two pairs of two. The first two– the day of memory and accounting and the day of atonement – are awe-inspiring and grave compared with the last two festivals, which are days of joy. At the same time, the first three holidays do have a common denominator: as much as these are Jewish holidays, they carry a universal message. Here, embedded within them, are three of humanity’s cardinal touchstones: accounting and judgment; mercy and atonement; and the joy of life. These attributes and qualities are essential to the lives of every human being. We mark the New Year by commemorating creation on the one hand, and celebrating the Kingship of the Lord on the other.

Both creation and God’s sovereignty pertain to all humankind and are not specifically Jewish. The Day of Atonement, too, is relevant to every human being. Life is full of mistakes and transgressions. Without atonement it would be unbearable to go on living with the unresolved and painful pieces of our past. Sukkot, at first glance, seems to be far more connected with Jewish history. Yet, at its essence, this holiday is actually a festival of thanksgiving for what we have.

Continued on page 2: High Holidays »

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