My A La Carte Hindu Wedding

Faced with the task of creating a traditional Hindu ceremony in a Western context, I chose two rituals most meaningful to me.

rubymint0705

02/27/2014 06:38:54 AM

It was nice reading your wedding story. Being a Hindu myself, I could very well relate to the wedding customs you have described but I am hearing about Pahari wedding for the first time.

am_i_a_hindu

03/20/2009 10:11:27 AM

I really wish every one who gets married print out the entire "Hindu Vedic wedding ceremony", which will be educational to every one , even for those who have no idea what Hindu marriage ritual is all about. For example, the Mantra that is chanted when bride and groom take the seven steps around the Holy Fire is very sweet and lovable. That mantra states, " By these seven steps you have taken with me, you have become my best friend. I will never move out of this relationship. God has united us in this bondage. We shall perform all activities together with love and affection and with good feelings. Let us be friendly in our thoughts. Let us observe our duties and rituals together. If you are the lyrics, I am the music. If you are the music I am the lyrics. If I am the heavenly body You are the earthly world. While I am the life source and you are the carrier of the same. I am the thoughts and you are the speech. When you are like the words, you work with me who is like the meaning of it. "

Devi9

10/08/2007 01:41:19 AM

It would be nice if the pundits would take responsibilty to help couples realize the significance of the ceremony including the dates and timing of the ceremony instead of catering to the requests. Our priest are here to teach and provide guidance, not to get paid for doing a mediocre ceremony because the bride wants the wedding on a satuday in spring. Maybe we might have many more marriages that last.

Devi9

10/08/2007 01:40:41 AM

hindu ceremonies are unlike any other religious ceremony. Hindus should learn about the significance for every ritual that they perform and be proud to perform the ceremony with sincerity. It is only time in your life where an average male and female can personify Vishnu and Laxshmi. I attending a wedding a few years ago with my family. The bride was Sikh and the groom was Hindu. The focus of the hindu ceremony which was only pushing 1.5 hours was the amount of gifts that the families were exchanging and finding the pair of shoes that the groom's family hid. After the ceremony, a friend of the groom's family asked the pundit why the full ceremony wasn't done. The pundit said that these days the children here (north america)don't want to sit for long ceremonies and that most of the time the marriages don't even last. I was quite disappointed to hear that comment.

MissingSB

07/05/2007 10:34:33 AM

I read your statement about your husband's family to mean that you believe Punjabis as a whole are unaware of the significance of religious rituals in a wedding. As a Brahmin Punjabi whose father is a lifelong scholar of Sanskrit and Vedanta, I would find your blanket assertion inaccurate, unnecessarily general, and quite offensive.

MacchiatoAmore

07/15/2006 03:24:14 AM

Um, I'm not Hindu, I'm not familiar with Hindu sayings and customs, but let me praise in this way: May you two share a long and blessed life together, and may the gods shower you in splendid glory and blessing. :)

mightymountaingorilla

07/09/2006 07:00:55 PM

I completely agree with everything that the author's father said about the issue of the marriage ceremony: every action, every step, every motion has an extremely complex and beautiful meaning behind it, and to just pick and choose is to lose the essence of the profound significance of marriage. I understand that when internationals live abroad, it is hard to accomodate everything as one would if they lived in their native lands. But, with all respect, I personally feel that it is necessary to do as much as possible, and that it resembles as closely as possible the actual ceremony. We all know. It's hard. It's difficult. It'll probably take a year of planning. But, in the end, you'll love the planning, you'll learn the symbolism, and you'll be glad you put forth the effort.

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