'He's Bringing Great Sadness
to Our Home'

Operation Rescue founder Randall Terry talks about his gay son.

BY: Interview by Paul O'Donnell

 

Continued from page 3

But what's your advice for others?

You have to from time to time bring it up. Ask, are you living celibate? Are you seeking any help? Are you going to confession? Are you going to therapy? Have you found a support group? At this point in human history, we've got an awful lot of data about breaking addictions, and we have a lot of experienced people out there to aid in the process.

So what I have found in my conversations with homosexuals over the years is that they reject the process of healing, because it's too painful and it's too time-consuming. People would rather go to an altar and pray and have all the feelings taken away for good than to spend three months in an in-patient program or in intensive therapy and have the pain of a long healing process. It's too easy to surrender.

"He'd been subjected to things and had seen things by the time he was 8 that would mar anybody for life."


Do you think he's a good son?

I'm proud of him in a number of ways. He's a very gifted young man. Right now he's bringing great sadness to our home and embarrassment to our family. Did you see the CNN piece [on the Terry family] last night? It was fraught with error.

Is there anything from the show you'd like to correct?

Yeah, I didn't run off with the secretary. It made it seem like I had committed adultery and then ran off with a secretary, neither of which happened.

Jamiel said that the divorce was a triggering thing for him.

I just don't buy it. He was living this life for years before that.

What he said to me was that it began for him the process of admitting it to himself, that doing that could bring him happiness.

I would contend that is a lie. The homosexual community has more acceptance in America than it ever has and the suicide rate is as high as it's always been. People commit suicide when they're in despair. They're in despair because they know in their heart of hearts that this sexual addiction is self-abusive and a horrifying, degrading lifestyle. I know my son, and believe me, he has not obtained peace or happiness.

But if it is behavioral, and you raised him, do you have any doubts about the way you raised him?

No. Any school of psychology will tell you that by the time a child is 6 or 7 years old, so much of their personality is formed, and any traumas that happened to them will be with them for the rest of their life. That's Psychology 101. We didn't get Jamiel till he was 8, as a foster child, and didn't adopt him till he was 14. He'd been subjected to things and had seen things by the time he was 8 that would mar anybody for life. So we gave him a safe home where he was loved and was not in danger. And he abused that, by his own admission.

So he's not welcome in your home but you still talk to him. To what end?

At this point we have to wait for his 15 minutes of fame to be over with. Then we'll let this die down and see. He has not been honest with me, about who contacted who, about what our family was like, about facts about me. It's very difficult to trust him right now.

comments powered by Disqus

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

DiggDeliciousNewsvineRedditStumbleTechnoratiFacebook