Singing the Experiences of a Community

An interview with Muslim hip hop group Native Deen

Continued from page 1

The album is so vibrant. What is your creative process like as a group?

Abdul-Malik - We all come from different backgrounds. You can see a hip hop vibe going through the whole album, but there’s a lot of other influences. The main thing we try to do is write what we’re feeling, what we’re experiencing, what our community is experiencing, and what our friends are going through. We try to address issues that we feel are most relevant. However that comes out to us, whether it’s in a more hip hop kind of song or a slower tempo song. I think to us the lyrics and the message is the most important thing. Our main audience is the younger audience, so we try to keep it upbeat and hip, and we try to make sure that whatever we do the lyrics are meaningful. I think that’s where we stand apart from other groups.

Your lyrics are rooted in Islam, but is there a passion from you guys to write music that pulls in other faiths?

Joshua – I think you hear that on all of our albums. Sometimes people only listen to the marketed song, the one that has the video, things like that. If people actually listen to our album, you find on all of our albums even going way back to MYNA raps, there’s some songs that are very generic and that appeal to wide audiences. In fact in our travels we’ve met people of other faiths. One of the situations I like to recall is when we ran into a priest. When he found out we were Native Deen he called his son over and said “hey it’s Native Deen!” He listened to the music with his son, because it’s positive rap music and he never felt like we were proselytizing him. On all of our albums you find songs that are good for all audiences, but on most of the songs there is a strong Muslim influence. That’s one thing we always hope for, that our music will go beyond our community. Yes we speak mainly to our community. But our goal is really to let people from other faiths know a little bit about what we are saying to each other and how we feel.

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What is the make-up of your fan base?

Abdul-Malik – It’s a very wide audience. It’s a lot of young people, but we just got a text from a guy who is 60 years old telling us how much he likes the songs. People as young as 2 year olds like it, a mom told us once. We have people who are African Americans, Immigrants, Arabs, Pakistanis, all different walks of life. What we try to do in making our music, is we try to write for our community, but we do try to keep it generic so that a song can go beyond one age or one ethnic group or one religion even.

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