Justin Bieber's Mom Has Her Own Story To Tell

Behind every great pop icon there’s a mother. In Justin Bieber‘s case, her name Pattie Mallette.

BY: John W. Kennedy

 

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JWK: What was it like being a single mom raising Justin Bieber? As someone with musical talent of your own, did you realize he had such abilities while he was growing up?

PM: Yeah. He’s always been super talented. I always had instruments around the house and I would write different songs and he would play on the little bongos and sing along and stuff. The thing is though when he was growing up he was always more interested in sports than he was in music.

JWK: So, he was well rounded.

PM: Yeah.

JWK: I understand you’re still friends with his father.

PM: Yeah, we’re friends today. Justin’s dad has been in the picture since he was a baby. He’s been there. I raised him. He lived alone with me. I had full custody but his dad would see him.

JWK: What’s it like to see your son become a superstar? How has that affected your life?

PM: It’s been a whirlwind but I think one of the greatest things about where Justin’s at today is I get to use the platform for good. I’ve been sharing my story since before Justin started his career but now I get the chance to put it in a book and to get my story out to so many more people than I would have before. That’s the best thing — that I get to use my platform for good.

JWK: Aside from opening your life and laying it bare for the public, was it difficult for you to dredge up and remember all the difficult things you’ve been through?

PM: Some parts were difficult but it was really good. It was cathartic. Writing and rewriting and editing and reediting, it was a good process.

JWK: The media loves to build people up but sometimes it seems to take even more delight in tearing them down. As a mother, is it difficult for you to watch and hear son be criticized and attacked in the press and online?

PM: You know, I think it’s hard for any parent to see anything negative said or done against your child and, when you can’t directly do something about it, it’s hard.

JWK: Where do you see yourself in five years?

PM: I would like to be producing more movies and traveling, doing some speaking and still making a difference in people’s lives. No matter what projects I’m taking on, I want to (do) things to help other people.

JWK: How’s it feel to have so many people following you on Twitter and liking you on Facebook?

PM: It’s amazing. I mean having over 2 million Twitter followers…is such an honor…It just means so much to me that I can use my pain and turn it around for someone else’s gain.

JWK: It’s seems clear to me that you’re happy now, that you’re in a good place now.

PM: I’m in a great place now. I’ve been through a lot of healing and that’s the whole point of this book. It’s not to say “You too can have a successful son!” It’s to say “Hey, there’s hope and there is healing no matter what darkness that you’ve been through or that you’re going through.”

For more from John W. Kennedy, visit his blog Faith, Media & Culture. 

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Related Topics: Entertainment, Justin Bieber

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