David Lynch's Peace Plan

The filmmaker discusses his love for Transcendental Meditation--and why he's seeking $7 billion and 8,000 meditation students.

BY: Interview by Michael Kress

 

Continued from page 2

When you start seeing the way that education is, to me, true education should be something that develops the full potential of the human being. That’s consciousness-based education, where the student gains total knowledge, or the student gains enlightenment. This is education—the rest is a farce, it’s a joke. It’s just to get a job. All that anxiety, all that stress, all those fears, all the negativity is still right there on that poor person, and they got a job. Big deal. It’s a joke what’s going on, and it’s time to start thinking about experiencing this beautiful unified field—which is really us. It’s our home, it’s us.



What is the significance of 10,000 people meditating?



Ten thousand people meditating scattered about is a good thing, but 10,000 people meditating as a group is, they say, “quadratically more powerful.” So, this foundation is called The David Lynch Foundation for Consciousness-Based

"Ten thousand people meditating..."

Education and World Peace. Real peace is not just the absence of war. Everybody knows there have been times where there have been no wars, but the seeds of war, the negativity, is still there. So real peace is, believe it or not, the absence of negativity. It’s a positive world. It’s real peace.

So I would like to raise money to get consciousness-based education going and to get these large peace-creating groups going. And one idea is a university of peace, where you can kill two birds with one stone—have consciousness-based education in a university of 8,000 or more students, and as they’re learning, they’re also doing their program as a group, which would be so powerful. They say it’s isotropically moving at the speed of light, [when meditating in] unity, it’s like a peace-creating factory. It pumps it and things get better in collective consciousness. And it’s science. It really works. And when you look at the alternatives, killing in the name of peace, which is the most absurd notion, but now this thing is here, this teaching is here, let’s give this a try.

How much money are you looking to raise--and how confident are you that you’ll be able to do that?

I say $7 billion would get a real good start. They say about three or four B-1 bombers would get peace on Earth. Instead of building those bombers--which are nice looking and they carry those rockets and all that--instead of building four of those, put seven peace-creating groups of 8,000-plus together and watch the need for B-1 bombers disappear.

On the individual level it’s a lot of money. There’s not that many people that could make it happen, but I sure would love to speak to Bill Gates about it.

How has TM influenced your filmmaking and creative life?

"I love ideas..."
I love ideas, and everything starts with an idea—a piece of furniture, a painting, a piece of music, it’s ideas, ideas, ideas. And if you could expand your consciousness, you can catch ideas at a deeper level. That means that there’s more in that idea. There’s more understanding of that idea. There’s more spark of inspiration in that idea. And knowing this, consciousness comes with a thing of knowingness and the way you work. Intuition, to me, is emotion and intellect going together in a kind of knowingness, and for a painter or a musician, it’s like a knowingness, where to go now, where to go, do this, do this, do this. This kind of thing is consciousness on the move, and the more of that you have, the deeper you can go, the more you enjoy the doing of it. It just changes, it just makes everything better. Because it’s a holistic experience, all the avenues get better.

You’ve talked a lot about this state of peace and transcendence that TM brings you. Is there any sort of disconnect between that and the darker aspects of life that you depict in so many of your films?

I think that you don’t need to suffer to show suffering. And that’s sort of what happens. You still fall in love with certain ideas, and stories will always have contrast, conflicts, highs and lows, goods and bads. It’s just a way a story is supposed to be. But the storyteller does not have to suffer or have those same things that the characters have.

_Related Features

comments powered by Disqus

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

DiggDeliciousNewsvineRedditStumbleTechnoratiFacebook